pinch back

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pinch back

To prune a plant by removing the main stem with one's fingertips to allow two new stems to sprout and flourish in its place. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pinch" and "back." A: "My avocado tree just isn't becoming very full as it grows." B: "Have you tried pinching it back? You'll want to pinch back the plant if you want it to grow big enough to bear fruit.
See also: back, pinch

pinch something back

to pinch off a bit of the top of a plant so it will branch and grow more fully. You should pinch this back so it will branch. Pinch back the new leaves at the top.
See also: back, pinch
References in periodicals archive ?
If repeatedly pinched back, you will can grow them in a hanging basket or window box.
The growth on mums should be pinched back once it gets more than 6 inches high.
Keep flowers grown in pots dead-headed and the leading shoots pinched back to encourage bushy growth.
Bark looks good even when winter shrubs like viburnurn X bodnantensis or hamamelis mollis are pinched back by frost.
I pinched back 'Magilla' in several of my beds last season to encourage a smaller stature, and it responded well.
Eventually he'll get so annoyed with losing all his stuff that he'll have to tidy up - and just as he's finishing, you could hurl everything you've pinched back under his bed, so that he'll never know.'
Pruning is done in June when all young shoots are pinched back so that only five leaves remain - this will encourage more fruiting shoots to form.
7 FUCHSIAS pruned earlier will now be producing young shoots which should be pinched back regularly to encourage bushy growth.
Keep those annuals pinched back. You wouldn't let your basil go straight up and go to flower, so don't let your lamb's quarter either.
Sure, we were pinched back a couple of times, but we were really never in contention.'
Analysis of this patch and of two closely related clover species allowed researchers to assess what genetic variation got lost when their inland clover population went through a so-called genetic bottleneck, pinched back to just one plant.
Many annuals and some perennials benefit from being pinched back early in the season: chrysanthemums, euryops, fuchsias, geraniums, impatiens, petunias, snapdragons, and zinnias, for instance.
Each of their final planting positions has been very well cultivated and the plants have been pinched back, to make them branch out, before planting.
Nearly Ninety has its isolated rewards, most often provided by dancers whose inherent beauty can be pinched back only so much.