pillar

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pillars to the temple

euphemism A woman's legs. Primarily heard in UK. I'm always attracted to women with great legs, and Sara's pillars to the temple are just phenomenal.
See also: pillar

pillar of strength

A supportive or emotionally strong person. My aunt has been a pillar of strength for me, helping me through many difficult moments in my life.
See also: of, pillar, strength

from pillar to post

From place to place. We've been going from pillar to post for the past five years. Can't we finally settle down here?
See also: pillar, post

from pillar to post

Fig. from one place to a series of other places; (figuratively) from person to person, as with gossip. My father was in the army, and we moved from pillar to post year after year. After I told one person my secret, it went quickly from pillar to post.
See also: pillar, post

pillar of strength

 and pillar of support
someone or something that consistently provides moral, emotional, or financial support as does a pillar. My parents are my pillars of support. John looked to God as his pillar of strength.
See also: of, pillar, strength

send someone from pillar to post

Fig. to send someone to many different places, none of which is the correct place. (Compare this with send someone on a wild-goose chase.) Jill sent Roger from pillar to post to look for a special kind of paper. Roger was sent from pillar to post with his problem.
See also: pillar, post, send

from pillar to post

From one thing or place to another, hither and thither. For example, After Kevin joined the Air Force, the family kept moving from pillar to post. This expression began life in the early 1400s as from post to pillar, an order no longer used, and is thought to allude to the banging about of a ball in the game of court tennis.
See also: pillar, post

from pillar to post

mainly BRITISH
If someone is moved from pillar to post, they are moved repeatedly from one place or position to another. We are exhausted after a weekend of being shoved from pillar to post. I didn't want the children pushed from pillar to post. Note: This expression comes from an early form of tennis that was played indoors. Players often played shots back and forth across the court, from the posts supporting the net to the pillars at the back of the court.
See also: pillar, post

a pillar of society

or

a pillar of the community

If you describe someone as a pillar of society or a pillar of the community, you mean that they are an active and respected member of a group of people. He is a pillar of society, the son every mother would love to have. My father had been a pillar of the community.
See also: of, pillar, society

pillar to post

BRITISH, JOURNALISM
In sport, especially horse racing, a pillar to post victory is one in which the winner was in the lead from the start of the race. Sally Prosser finished top of the Asian circuit, thanks largely to a pillar to post victory in the JAL Malaysian Open. Note: This may refer to the posts that mark the start and finish of a racecourse.
See also: pillar, post

a tower of strength

or

a pillar of strength

COMMON If someone is a tower of strength or a pillar of strength during a difficult period in your life, they give you a lot of help or support. My eldest daughter was a tower of strength for me when I was sick. In her terrible sadness she has found Charles to be a pillar of strength.
See also: of, strength, tower

from pillar to post

from one place to another in an unceremonious or fruitless manner.
This expression may have developed with reference to the rebounding of a ball in a real-tennis court. It has been in use in this form since the mid 16th century, though its earlier form, from post to pillar , dates back to the early 15th century.
2002 Independent There will be ‘a single door to knock on’ so people with a point to make are not passed endlessly from pillar to post.
See also: pillar, post

a pillar of society

a person regarded as a particularly responsible citizen.
The use of pillar to mean ‘a person regarded as a mainstay or support for something’ is recorded from medieval times; Pillars of Society was the English title of an 1888 play by the Norwegian dramatist Henrik Ibsen .
See also: of, pillar, society

a tower (or pillar) of strength

a person who can be relied upon to be a source of strong support and comfort.
This phrase may come from the Book of Common Prayer: ‘O Lord…be unto them a tower of strength’.
See also: of, strength, tower

be driven, pushed, etc. from ˌpillar to ˈpost

be forced to go from one person or situation to another without achieving anything: Vast numbers of refugees have been pushed from pillar to post in that area.
See also: pillar, post

a pillar of soˈciety, etc.

a person who is respected in society, etc.; a person of importance: I couldn’t believe that a pillar of the community like him had been caught stealing from his employer.
See also: of, pillar

a ˌpillar/ˌtower of ˈstrength

a person who gives you the courage and determination to continue when you are in a bad situation: My wife has been a tower of strength during my illness.During your five years in prison, Terry was a pillar of strength.
See also: of, pillar, strength, tower

send someone from pillar to post

tv. to send someone from place to place; to give someone the runaround. Red tape everywhere I went. They sent me from pillar to post until closing time.
See also: pillar, post, send

from pillar to post

From one place to another; hither and thither.
See also: pillar, post
References in classic literature ?
The youngsters told off to the pillars had refused to chew scrap-wax because it made their jaws ache, and were clamouring for virgin stuff.
Seems as if we'd have to chew scrap-wax for these pillars, after all," said a worker.
Most of them were rented to traders, as we rent the arches of a viaduct; the space between pillar and pillar being bricked or boarded off into rooms, which were guarded by heavy wooden doors and cumbrous native padlocks.
In the far north-east sky he could see between the pillars a level streak of light.
The eastward pillars and their architraves stood up blackly against the light, and the great flame-shaped Sun-stone beyond them; and the Stone of Sacrifice midway.
When they saw where she lay, which they had not done till then, they showed no objection, and stood watching her, as still as the pillars around.
The next pillar was isolated; others composed a trilithon; others were prostrate, their flanks forming a causeway wide enough for a carriage and it was soon obvious that they made up a forest of monoliths grouped upon the grassy expanse of the plain.
The crowd grew more dense every moment, and, like water, which rises above its normal level, began to mount along the walls, to swell around the pillars, to spread out on the entablatures, on the cornices, on the window-sills, on all the salient points of the architecture, on all the reliefs of the sculpture.
demanded Jehan Frollo du Moulin, who, as he was clinging to one of the inner pillars, could not see what was going on outside.
Master Andry raised his eyes, seemed to measure in an instant the height of the pillar, the weight of the scamp, mentally multiplied that weight by the square of the velocity and remained silent.
The captain, illumining with trembling pine-torch this frightful carnage, of which he in vain sought the cause, drew back towards the pillar behind which Porthos was concealed.
At least we may take the tablets from the walls, though the pillars are too heavy for us to handle; but there should be great storerooms filled with gold--gold that we can carry away upon our backs with ease.
After Jos went to Court, which we may be sure he did as a loyal subject of his Sovereign (showing himself in his full court suit at the Club, whither Dobbin came to fetch him in a very shabby old uniform) he who had always been a staunch Loyalist and admirer of George IV, became such a tremendous Tory and pillar of the State that he was for having Amelia to go to a Drawing-room, too.
Well, no heart need despair; for there is not a woman that wouldn't at some time or other get down from her pillar for no bigger bribe perhaps than just a flower which is fresh to-day and withered to-morrow.
There's a old 'un under the seventh pillar on the left as you go down the broken steps of the little underground chapel as formerly was; I make him out (so fur as I've made him out yet) to be one of them old 'uns with a crook.