pillar


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pillars to the temple

euphemism A woman's legs. Primarily heard in UK. I'm always attracted to women with great legs, and Sara's pillars to the temple are just phenomenal.
See also: pillar

pillar of strength

A supportive or emotionally strong person. My aunt has been a pillar of strength for me, helping me through many difficult moments in my life.
See also: of, pillar, strength

from pillar to post

From place to place. We've been going from pillar to post for the past five years. Can't we finally settle down here?
See also: pillar, post

be pushed from pillar to post

To be forced or coerced to travel from place to place. We've been pushed from pillar to post for the past five years. Can't we finally settle down here?
See also: pillar, post, push

pillar-to-post

In a race (especially a horse race), leading from the very beginning to the very end. It was another pillar-to-post win for Blind Fury and her jockey Jeff Smith. The pillar-to-post victory puts the Irish rowing crew at the top of their division.

pillar of society

One who is a particularly active, respected, and influential member of one's local social sphere. My grandfather was a pillar of society because of how many people his businesses employed. She was long considered a pillar of society, so she won the mayoral election with ease.
See also: of, pillar, society

pillar of the community

One who is a particularly active, respected, and influential member of one's local social sphere. My grandfather was a pillar of the community because of how many people his businesses employed. She was long considered a pillar of the community, so she won the mayoral election with ease.
See also: community, of, pillar

pillar of (something)

One who is a particularly active, respected, and influential member of or contributor to some particular thing or group. He had long been considered a pillar of the industry, but the recent scandal has reduced his reputation to dust. Global expansion has been a pillar of the company's long-term plan for many years now.
See also: of, pillar

send (one) from pillar to post

To instruct or direct one to travel from place to place, especially in a futile, indeterminate, or impermanent manner. They've been sending me from pillar to post looking for the right replacement part, but nowhere seems to have it. He's been sent from pillar to post for his work. I wish they would give him a break from so much travel.
See also: pillar, post, send

from pillar to post

Fig. from one place to a series of other places; (figuratively) from person to person, as with gossip. My father was in the army, and we moved from pillar to post year after year. After I told one person my secret, it went quickly from pillar to post.
See also: pillar, post

pillar of strength

 and pillar of support
someone or something that consistently provides moral, emotional, or financial support as does a pillar. My parents are my pillars of support. John looked to God as his pillar of strength.
See also: of, pillar, strength

send someone from pillar to post

Fig. to send someone to many different places, none of which is the correct place. (Compare this with send someone on a wild-goose chase.) Jill sent Roger from pillar to post to look for a special kind of paper. Roger was sent from pillar to post with his problem.
See also: pillar, post, send

from pillar to post

From one thing or place to another, hither and thither. For example, After Kevin joined the Air Force, the family kept moving from pillar to post. This expression began life in the early 1400s as from post to pillar, an order no longer used, and is thought to allude to the banging about of a ball in the game of court tennis.
See also: pillar, post

from pillar to post

mainly BRITISH
If someone is moved from pillar to post, they are moved repeatedly from one place or position to another. We are exhausted after a weekend of being shoved from pillar to post. I didn't want the children pushed from pillar to post. Note: This expression comes from an early form of tennis that was played indoors. Players often played shots back and forth across the court, from the posts supporting the net to the pillars at the back of the court.
See also: pillar, post

a pillar of society

or

a pillar of the community

If you describe someone as a pillar of society or a pillar of the community, you mean that they are an active and respected member of a group of people. He is a pillar of society, the son every mother would love to have. My father had been a pillar of the community.
See also: of, pillar, society

pillar to post

BRITISH, JOURNALISM
In sport, especially horse racing, a pillar to post victory is one in which the winner was in the lead from the start of the race. Sally Prosser finished top of the Asian circuit, thanks largely to a pillar to post victory in the JAL Malaysian Open. Note: This may refer to the posts that mark the start and finish of a racecourse.
See also: pillar, post

a tower of strength

or

a pillar of strength

COMMON If someone is a tower of strength or a pillar of strength during a difficult period in your life, they give you a lot of help or support. My eldest daughter was a tower of strength for me when I was sick. In her terrible sadness she has found Charles to be a pillar of strength.
See also: of, strength, tower

from pillar to post

from one place to another in an unceremonious or fruitless manner.
This expression may have developed with reference to the rebounding of a ball in a real-tennis court. It has been in use in this form since the mid 16th century, though its earlier form, from post to pillar , dates back to the early 15th century.
2002 Independent There will be ‘a single door to knock on’ so people with a point to make are not passed endlessly from pillar to post.
See also: pillar, post

a pillar of society

a person regarded as a particularly responsible citizen.
The use of pillar to mean ‘a person regarded as a mainstay or support for something’ is recorded from medieval times; Pillars of Society was the English title of an 1888 play by the Norwegian dramatist Henrik Ibsen .
See also: of, pillar, society

a tower (or pillar) of strength

a person who can be relied upon to be a source of strong support and comfort.
This phrase may come from the Book of Common Prayer: ‘O Lord…be unto them a tower of strength’.
See also: of, strength, tower

be driven, pushed, etc. from ˌpillar to ˈpost

be forced to go from one person or situation to another without achieving anything: Vast numbers of refugees have been pushed from pillar to post in that area.
See also: pillar, post

a pillar of soˈciety, etc.

a person who is respected in society, etc.; a person of importance: I couldn’t believe that a pillar of the community like him had been caught stealing from his employer.
See also: of, pillar

a ˌpillar/ˌtower of ˈstrength

a person who gives you the courage and determination to continue when you are in a bad situation: My wife has been a tower of strength during my illness.During your five years in prison, Terry was a pillar of strength.
See also: of, pillar, strength, tower

send someone from pillar to post

tv. to send someone from place to place; to give someone the runaround. Red tape everywhere I went. They sent me from pillar to post until closing time.
See also: pillar, post, send, someone

from pillar to post

From one place to another; hither and thither.
See also: pillar, post

from pillar to post

From one place or thing to another; hither and yon. This expression, which originally (fifteenth century) was from post to pillar, is believed by some to come from the old game of court tennis and to allude to the banging about of balls in a sport that had much looser rules than present-day lawn tennis. Another theory is that the term originally meant from whipping-post to pillory (punishment to hanging), which would better account for the original order. It first appeared in John Lydgate’s The Assembly of Gods (ca. 1420). Dickens (Bleak House, 1853) used both the old and the new versions: “So badgered, and worried, and tortured, by being knocked about from post to pillar, and from pillar to post.”
See also: pillar, post

pillar of society, a

A chief supporter of one’s community, social group, or other institution. The earliest example of being such a pillar dates from the early fourteenth century and involves a pillar of the church, which Eric Partridge deemed a particularly objectionable cliché by 1800 or so. Shakespeare used a slightly different locution in The Merchant of Venice; at the trial Shylock says, “I charge you by the law, whereof you are a well-deserving pillar,” presumably hoping that the judge will respond favorably to this compliment. From the late nineteenth century on, pillar of society was often used sarcastically or pejoratively, the target generally being both the individual and the society being upheld. Ibsen so used it in his play, translated as Pillars of Society (1877), and his example was followed by Shaw and others. Still another variant, pillar of the community, may be used either ironically or straightforwardly.
See also: of, pillar
References in periodicals archive ?
The CS said she could not immediately reveal the amount set aside for the rehabilitation of the ancient pillar or the total allocation for protecting historical sites and monuments.
Leading players profiled in the vehicle pillar market report include Elsa Llc (the US), Sewon America (the US), Gestamp (Spain), Benteler Automotive (US), Shiloh Industries (US), Tower International (US), Aisin Seiki (Japan), Martinrea International (Canada), Toyotomi Kiko Co (Japan), Tianjin Toyotetsu Automobile (Japan), G-Tekt Corporation (Japan), Kirchhoff Automotive Gmbh (Germany), and Unipres Corporation (Japan), among others.
Brian Craig, CEO and sub-investigator rater, says, "The launch of Pillar Precision is a landmark event in our company and our industry.
'We will involve private firms and allocate them a small space for advertisement on the pillars and they will carry out the beautification work free of cost,' he said.He said the PHA would give the private firms the design for the beautification of the pillars, adding the chief minister approved the idea during a visit to the civic body office last week.
During retreat mining, two continuous miners (CMs) are used simultaneously to extract each row of pillars. In this method of pillar extraction, mining progresses from the center of the panel outward in a staggered fashion.
On the pillars! On the four pillars that support this great wall we have.
WEF says that its Macroeconomic stability pillar measures the key factors impacting a country's competitiveness through its investment decision channel.
In Zamboanga City, where the image of Nuestra Senora La Virgin del Pillar has been venerated for almost four centuries, devotees will gather at her shrine in Fort Pilar for the Eucharistic celebration.
The first pillar is the mandatory state-run Pension and Disability Insurance Fund, which works by the principle of generation solidarity.
Summary: New Delhi [India], Jul 8 (ANI): The Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) on Sunday refuted reports of alleged shifting of boundary pillars in the Manipur sector of the India-Myanmar border.
London-based Jinbi Token, a gold-backed blockchain business, has partnered with data protection rights foundation Pillar Project, the company said.
M2 EQUITYBITES-July 2, 2018-London-based Jinbi Token partners with Pillar Project
Global Banking News-July 2, 2018-London-based Jinbi Token partners with Pillar Project
The Company's Land Development and Property pillar saw revenue stay flat at Rp1,100.7 billion in 2017 compared to Rp1,101.4 billion in 2016.
The new regime, for which IA aims to implement quantitative requirements in 2021 or later, will consist of three pillars - quantitative (Pillar 1), qualitative (Pillar 2) and disclosure (Pillar 3) - similarly to RBC regimes in other jurisdictions.