pilfer from (someone or something)

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pilfer from (someone or something)

1. To steal from someone, something, or some group, especially in a furtive or deceptive manner. The CEO was caught pilfering from the company's pension funds. I have no doubt the school has been pilfering from its students. I heard Tom and Janet's daughter has been pilfering from them lately.
2. To steal something from someone, something, or some group in small amounts, especially in a furtive or deceptive manner. I've been pilfering a few dollars from my parents at a time, so I doubt they'll notice. I guess Tom had been pilfering office supplies from the company for years before he was finally caught.
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Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

pilfer something from someone or something

to steal something from someone or something. Did you pilfer this money from your parents? Who pilfered some money from the cash box?
See also: pilfer

pilfer from someone or something

to steal from someone or a group. The petty thief had pilfered from several merchants in town. Someone has pilfered from the petty-cash drawer.
See also: pilfer
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pilfered

(ˈpɪlfɚd)
mod. alcohol intoxicated. I’ve had too much. I’m beginning to feel pilfered.
See also: pilfer
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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