piles


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pile on the pounds

To put on weight quickly, especially a large or excessive amount. Wow, Jim really piled on the pounds on while he was on his sabbatical. I'm trying to pile on the pounds so I can make it on the football team this fall!
See also: on, pile, pound

pile Pelion on Ossa

1. To further complicate something that is already tedious or challenging. Ossa and Pelion are two mountains in Greece. A: "I told Becky you would pick her up." B: "I already have so much to do today—quit piling Pelion on Ossa!" Just when I thought I was almost done sorting these files, my boss piled Pelion on Ossa and brought me another box of them.
2. To do something that seems futile. I know that I'm just piling Pelion on Ossa by telling you to stay away from that boy, but I'm your father, and I don't want to see you get hurt. That couch will never fit up the steps—tell them to stop piling Pelion on Ossa!
See also: on, ossa, Pelion, pile

pile up

1. To accumulate, gather, or increase over time. Please don't let your dirty dishes pile up—put them in the dishwasher or clean them yourself! With Deborah out sick all week, jobs have begun to pile up in our department.
2. To put something into a pile or heap. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pile" and "up." Just pile up your garden waste on the curb, and we will be around in the morning to collect it.
3. To crash into or on top of one another. Because of the black ice on the roads, nearly a dozen cars piled up as they tried in vain to come to a stop.
See also: pile, up

pile it on

To continue to add to something until the amount or effect becomes excessive. I like what you've written so far, but you should try being more subtle with the dramatic tensions between the characters—it just feels like you're piling it on a bit. Poor Samantha. Her mother died last winter, her husband lost his job recently, and now she's been diagnosed with breast cancer. Fate has just been piling it on.
See also: on, pile

pile in(to) something

1. To enter into something in a rough, disorderly fashion. We had Jake and all his friends pile into the van after their soccer practice. OK, everybody pile in, the train doors won't stay open for long!
2. To gather and load a large number of people or things into something, especially in a rough, disorderly fashion. Jake's car was broken, so Samantha just piled us all into hers. You can just pile all those books into my backpack.
See also: pile, something

pile out (of something)

To exit or disembark from something in a rough, disorderly fashion. Jake and his friends piled out of the van to go to soccer practice. We need to count heads as you leave the bus, so don't everyone pile out all at once!
See also: out, pile

pile of crap

1. rude slang A lot of malicious or ignorant lies. Tom came into the meeting with his usual pile of crap about the state of his project. A: "They said they couldn't accept your application because you don't have the proper certifications." B: "What a pile of crap! I'm more than qualified with the amount of work experience I've got!"
2. rude slang Someone or something that is totally or utterly worthless, contemptible, or inferior. This old car my grandfather gave me is a total pile of crap! You pile of crap! You take that back or I'll smash your face in!
See also: crap, of, pile

pile of shit

1. vulgar slang A lot of malicious or ignorant lies. Tom came into the meeting with his usual pile of shit about the state of his project. A: "They said they couldn't accept your application because you don't have the proper certifications." B: "What a pile of shit! I'm more than qualified with the amount of work experience I've got!"
2. vulgar slang Someone or something that is totally or utterly worthless, contemptible, or inferior. This old car my grandfather gave me is a total pile of shit! You pile of shit! You take that back or I'll smash your face in!
See also: of, pile, shit

pile off

To climb down (from something) or disembark (off something), especially in a rough, disorderly fashion. We all piled off the bus and ran toward the beach. The van pulled up and all the kids piled off. The kids piled off the trampoline when I called them in for dinner.
See also: off, pile

pile on(to)

1. To climb or clamber on(to) someone or something all at once or in a heap. We all piled on as soon as they opened the doors of the bus. The whole team piled onto the running back after he scored the winning touchdown. The kids piled on the bed to watch the scary movie together.
2. To load many people or things on(to) someone or something all at once or in a heap. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "pile" and "on(to)." He just kept piling the papers on my desk throughout the day. We had to pile everyone onto the tour bus in a hurry so that they didn't miss the reservation. The wagon was already full of produce, but the pickers just kept piling it on.
3. To continue to increase or add up against someone or something. Typically used in reference to evidence, accusations, criticisms, etc. Now that one person has come forward to accuse him of embezzlement, more and more testimony keeps piling on. Criticisms were piling onto the embattled CEO, until finally he was forced to resign from the company. With the amount of bad press that's been piling on the senator, you'd think he would avoid the public spotlight for a while.
4. To continue to uncover or direct negative or damaging things, such as evidence, accusations, criticisms, etc., against someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "pile" and "on(to)." He's already been given a lecture by the teacher—there's no need to pile more on now. Investigators have continued piling evidence onto the alleged crime lord in an attempt to finally put him away once and for all.
5. To criticize or attack someone in speech or writing all at once or in great numbers. People from across the state have been piling onto me ever since I wrote my controversial opinion piece for the local paper. She's been through enough already—I don't think we need to pile on any further.
See also: pile

pile on the work

To continuously or consistently increase the amount of work one or someone else has to do. If he keeps piling on the work like this, he's going to drive himself to an early grave. The boss has been piling on the work lately in order for us to get this project finished before Christmas.
See also: on, pile, work

pile the work on

To continuously or consistently increase the amount of work one or someone else has to do. If he keeps piling the work on like this, he's going to drive himself to an early grave. The boss has been piling the work on us lately in order to get this project finished before Christmas.
See also: on, pile, work

pile the agony on

To exaggerate one's pain, difficulties, or problems in order to get more sympathy from others. Primarily heard in UK. My wife's been piling the agony on about her sore back so that I'll do more of the work around the house this weekend. Did you hear Tom? He was really piling the agony on to the boss to try to get this Friday off work.
See also: agony, on, pile

pile the gloom on

To exaggerate one's pain, difficulties, or problems in order to get more sympathy from others. Primarily heard in UK. My wife's been piling the gloom on about her sore back so that I'll do more of the work around the house this weekend. Did you hear Tom? He was really piling the gloom on to the boss to try to get this Friday off work.
See also: gloom, on, pile

pile on the gloom

To exaggerate one's pain, difficulties, or problems in order to get more sympathy from others. Primarily heard in UK. My wife's been piling on the gloom about her sore back so that I'll do more of the work around the house this weekend. Did you hear Tom? He was really piling on the gloom to the boss to try to get this Friday off work.
See also: gloom, on, pile

pile the pounds on

To put on weight quickly, especially a large or excessive amount. Wow, Jim really piled the pounds on while he was on his sabbatical. I'm trying to pile the pounds on so I can make it on the football team this fall!
See also: on, pile, pound

pile off (something)

to get down off something; to clamber down off something. All the kids piled off the wagon and ran into the barn. She stopped the wagon, and they piled off.
See also: off, pile

pile something up

 
1. to crash or wreck something. Drive carefully if you don't want to pile the car up. The driver piled up the car against a tree.
2. to make something into a heap. Carl piled all the leaves up and set them afire. Please pile up the leaves.
See also: pile, up

pile the work on (someone)

Fig. to give someone a lot of work to do. The boss really piled the work on me this week. The boss piled on the work this week.
See also: on, pile, work

pile up

 
1. Lit. [for things] to gather or accumulate. The newspapers began to pile up after a few days. Work is really piling up around here.
2. Fig. [for a number of vehicles] to crash together. Nearly twenty cars piled up on the bridge this morning.
See also: pile, up

pile up

1. Accumulate, as in The leaves piled up in the yard, or He piled up a huge fortune. In this idiom pile means "form a heap or mass of something." [Mid-1800s]
2. Be involved in a crash, as in When the police arrived, at least four cars had piled up. [Late 1800s]
See also: pile, up

pile (or heap) Pelion on Ossa

add an extra difficulty or task to an already difficult situation or undertaking. literary
In Greek mythology, the mountain Pelion was held to be the home of the centaurs, and the giants were said to have piled Mounts Olympus and Ossa on its summit in their attempt to reach the heavens and destroy the gods.
See also: on, ossa, Pelion, pile

pile it on

exaggerate for effect. informal
See also: on, pile

pile up

v.
1. To arrange something into a pile: We piled up the firewood in the garage. I piled the dirty dishes up in the sink.
2. To accumulate: My bills piled up while I was in the hospital.
3. To cause something to accumulate: The company is piling up debt with its risky investments. The team piled 40 points up in the first half of the game.
4. To crash into each other; collide. Used especially of vehicles: Because of the thick fog, dozens of cars piled up on the freeway.
See also: pile, up

pile of shit

1. n. a mass of lies. (Refers to bullshit. Usually objectionable.) He came in and told me this great pile of shit about how his alarm clock was in the shop.
2. n. any worthless structure or device. (Usually objectionable.) Take this pile of shit back where you bought it and get your money back.
3. n. a totally worthless person. (Rude and derogatory.) Todd, you are the biggest pile of shit I’ve ever seen.
See also: of, pile, shit
References in periodicals archive ?
The normal pile was numbered #1, and the two squeezed branch piles were numbered #2 and #3.
Parashar further added, "Oats, beans, sesame seeds, radish, turnips, onions, dried figs, amla, and papaya are some of those fiber-rich edibles that do wonder to prevent and cure piles, and they should be available in the kitchen every day, but if the pile is growing despite all precautions, then medication is must, and one should be aware of the fact that except Ayurveda no pathy provides complete relief from piles (haemorrhoids).
There are many experimental investigationson piles embedded in cohesive and cohesionless soils subjected to both static and cyclic lateral loads.
For each analysis position, from the surface to the bottom of the model, settlement of the center of filling layer, center of cushion, surface of soil between piles, center of soil between piles, bottom of soil between piles, and center of loess layer were selected for analysis.
Erman, "New method for predicting the ultimate bearing capacity of driven piles by using Flap number," KSCE Journal of Civil Engineering, vol.
Staff from the USFS Rocky Mountain Research Station Missoula Fire Lab conducted field measurements characterizing air pollutant emissions from an open burn of one of the forest slash residue piles at BFRS (for details see Baker et al.
Two plants of a company, ZKB, were running on full potential to carry out concrete work on piles on Bosan road segment of the project while a site is being located to instal the third concrete plant.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: 102 patients with first to third degree piles were prospectively treated and four groups emerged: (I) injection Sclerotherapy (n=25), (II) Sclerotherapy and Band ligation (n=17), (III) Sclerotherapy and hemorrhoidectomy (n=24), (lV) Sclerotherapy, Banding and hemorrhoidectomy (n=36).
CIS used its new remotely operated Subsea Piling System, which makes it possible to drive piles as large as 36-inches in diameter, in water depths to 300 metres.
A pneumatic saw and track system can be attached to concrete pilings to even off tops and casings, or remove piles in one piece to simplify reprocessing.
CEO HE Eng Saeed G Al Romaithi, said: "To meet the requirements of our customers and to further expand our product range, we are developing a wide portfolio of sheet piles, a range that possesses significant and highly cost-effective structural and pile driving properties.
The Company has proudly provided foundation pile driving services since 1990; installing pre-stressed concrete and exposed wood piles for some of the area's premier builders.