piece (something) together

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piece (something) together

1. Literally, to fit the pieces of something together into a whole. She got some super glue and pieced the broken lamp back together.
2. To make sense of something by analyzing multiple pieces of information and drawing a conclusion based on what they collectively indicate. Federal investigators are experts at piecing evidence together to track down criminals. At first I was confused by all the strange ways Janet was behaving, but then I pieced it together and realized what she's been up to.
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piece something together

to fit something together; to assemble the pieces of something, such as a puzzle or something puzzling, and make sense of it. The police were unable to piece the story together. The detective tried to piece together the events leading up to the crime.
See also: piece, together

piece together

Join or combine parts into a whole, as in With information from several observers, she pieced together an account of what had actually taken place . [Late 1500s]
See also: piece, together

piece together

v.
To join or unite the pieces of something: We pieced the broken vase together. The detective pieced together the sequence of events leading up to the accident by interviewing witnesses.
See also: piece, together
References in periodicals archive ?
Me: "Aggghhhhhh." What follows is an hour of running around trying to help them piece together something from the "box of bits and pieces you might need in an emergency" and going dressed as a footballer.
Archaeology, combined with early inscriptions and texts, offers us important clues which help us to piece together something of the fascinating world of early Christianity.
The leaker also says that "Red Dead Redemption 2" will take place three years after the first game, and Jack Marston is trying to piece together something that he found in his father's journal.
She uses these excerpts to piece together something of Fergusson's intellectual life as well as to explore her interpersonal relationships.
Hill's primary agenda is to explain the composer's repudiation "of his original ideas for the Rite" (i.e., that the work developed from a dramatic scenario, not as absolute music) and to "piece together something of the true picture which Stravinsky ...
"Get a professional to set up a whole system," advises a communicator at a state government office, "word processing software, layout, hardware--don't try to piece together something by yourself.