pie in the sky

(redirected from pie-in-the-sky)

pie in the sky

An impossible, unlikely, or fanciful idea or plan. (Hyphenated if used before a noun.) He keeps talking about how he'll move to Los Angeles to be a famous actor, but it's just pie in the sky if you ask me. If you'd spend more time working and less time coming up with these pie-in-the-sky fantasies, you might actually get somewhere in life!
See also: pie, sky

pie in the sky

 
1. Fig. a future reward after death, considered as a replacement for a reward not received on earth. Don't hold out for pie in the sky. Get realistic. If he didn't hope for some heavenly pie in the sky, he would probably be a real crook.
2. Fig. having to do with a hope for a special reward. (This is hyphenated before a nominal.) Get rid of your pie-in-the-sky ideas! What these pie-in-the-sky people really want is money.
See also: pie, sky

pie in the sky

An empty wish or promise, as in His dream of being hired as a sports editor proved to be pie in the sky. This expression was first recorded in 1911 in a rallying song of a union, the International Workers of the World (or "Wobblies"): "Work and pray, live on hay, you'll get pie in the sky when you die."
See also: pie, sky

pie in the sky

COMMON If you describe an idea, plan, or promise as pie in the sky, you mean that it is very unlikely to happen. Targets set for oil production now look like pie in the sky. Ideally what I would like to see would be free childcare, but I think that's a bit pie in the sky at the moment. Note: You can also use pie-in-the-sky before a noun. Changes are a real possibility. This is not pie-in-the-sky stuff. Note: This expression comes from the song `The Preacher and the Slave' (1911) by Joe Hill, an American songwriter and workers' organizer: `You'll get pie in the sky when you die. (That's a lie.)'
See also: pie, sky

pie in the sky

something that is agreeable to contemplate but very unlikely to be realized. informal
This phrase comes from a 1911 song by the American labour leader Joe Hill ( 1879–1915 ), in which a preacher tells a slave: ‘Work and pray, live on hay, You'll get pie in the sky when you die’.
See also: pie, sky

ˌpie in the ˈsky

(informal) ideas that are not practical; false hopes or promises: Most voters know that the big promises which politicians make before an election are just pie in the sky.He says he’s going to make a movie in Hollywood, but I think it’s all pie in the sky.This comes from a song written in 1911 by Joe Hill, who worked to improve the rights of workers in America. The song criticizes religion for creating false hopes in the poor:‘Work and pray, Live on hay, You’ll get pie in the sky when you die.’
See also: pie, sky

pie in the sky

1. n. a reward; a special heavenly reward. If he didn’t hope for some heavenly pie in the sky, he would probably be a real crook.
2. mod. having to do with a hope for a special reward. (This is hyphenated before a nominal.) Get rid of your pie-in-the-sky ideas!
See also: pie, sky

pie in the sky

An empty wish or promise: "To outlaw deficits ... is pie in the sky" (Howard H. Baker, Jr.)
See also: pie, sky