pick (one's) battle(s)

(redirected from pick your battle)

pick (one's) battle(s)

To choose not to participate in minor, unimportant, or overly difficult arguments, contests, or confrontations, saving one's strength instead for those that will be of greater importance or where one has a greater chance of success. As a parent, you learn to pick your battles with your kids so you don't run yourself ragged with nagging them. The best politicians pick their battles wisely: if one becomes too embroiled in petty debates, one never gets anything done.
See also: pick
References in periodicals archive ?
Whether it's a question of tone, timing, or common sense, one thing is clear: If you're going to rely on them, you must pick your battles.
And pick your battles rather than nagging him over everything - some things are worth letting go by the wayside in the grand scheme of things.
Being a credible advocate does mean admitting rail isn't always the ideal solution; you must pick your battles wisely.
You have to pick your battles," said Worthen, who became managing editor about a year ago after running the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette's Pine Bluff bureau for nearly five years.
You have to pick your battles with a Chessie because you will never be the winner every time.
And, if you want at least five minutes of peace, sometimes it's best to pick your battles and give in to requests, especially if you think it might combat some of the summer holiday boredom.
You have to pick your battles," he said, adding that this one was "taking away from the message" of his campaign.
Pick your battles carefully, with an eye to personal satisfaction.
I'm a fighter, but you have to pick your battles in life" Ukip leader Nigel Farage, after being accused of running away from fighting the Newark by-election "Jeremy Clarkson is not a racist.
I'm a fighter, I'm a warrior, but you have to pick your battles in life.
Maybe it's more effective to pick your battles, says Dembling, suggesting you instead choose smaller events inside your comfort zone.
There's no way you can work your way through all the variety, so the best strategy is to pick your battles.
I'm not criticizing the Obama administration on these points -- you have to pick your battles and, however important the policy concern, it seems these are battles the administration chose not to pick.
I think it's a case of knowing when to spend time apart, knowing when to pick your battles and when to bite your tongue," Tony smiles.