phrase

(redirected from phrasing)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

coin a phrase

To create a new expression. Don't try to coin a phrase, just write a straightforward headline.
See also: coin, phrase

might as well

Should (do something), typically because there is no reason not to. The deadline is today, but you might as well send it in anyway—they may still accept it. A: "Are you going to work late tonight?" B: "I might as well. I have nothing else going on."
See also: might, well

stock phrase

A well-known, overused phrase; a cliché. As this is a creative writing class, I don't want to see any stock phrases in your stories. Please rewrite this paragraph in your own words, instead of using stock phrases like "think outside the box."
See also: phrase, stock

to coin a phrase

A set phrase said after one uses a new expression. It is typically used jocularly to indicate the opposite (i.e. that one has just used a well-known or trite saying). Well, we can't do anything about it now, so "que sera sera," to coin a phrase.
See also: coin, phrase, to

to put it another way

To rephrase something; to express something in a different way. This is a set phrase, so the verb is not conjugated. I'm afraid your sales figures haven't been in line with the figures generated by our estimates. To put it another way, Tom, your performance has been really underwhelming. The universe is huge and uncaring to our choices or ambitions. To put it another, more optimistic way, our fates are ours to decide for ourselves.
See also: another, put, to, way

turn a phrase

To express something in very adept, elegant, and clever terms. Mr. Broadmoor is so cultivated and witty. Not only is he remarkably intelligent, but he is always able to turn a phrase most poignantly.
See also: phrase, turn

turn of phrase

1. An expression. I understood what she was saying until she used a turn of phrase that I had never heard.
2. An eloquent style of writing or speaking. That writer's turn of phrase has earned him many accolades and awards.
See also: of, phrase, turn

when you get a chance

As soon as you have a bit of free time. Hey, Sarah? When you get a chance, would you mind looking over these financial reports? There's something I want to discuss with you when you get a chance.
See also: chance, get
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

coin a phrase

Fig. to create a new expression that is worthy of being remembered and repeated. (Often jocular.) He is "worth his weight in feathers," to coin a phrase.
See also: coin, phrase

let me (just) say

 and just let me say
a phrase introducing something that the speaker thinks is important. Rachel: Let me say how pleased we all are with your efforts. Henry: Why, thank you very much. Bob: Just let me say that we're extremely pleased with your activity. Bill: Thanks loads. I did what I could.
See also: let, say

might as well

 and may as well
a phrase indicating that it is probably better to do something than not to do it. Bill: Should we try to get there for the first showing of the film? Jane: Might as well. Nothing else to do. Andy: May as well leave now. It doesn't matter if we arrive a little bit early. Jane: Why do we always have to be the first to arrive?
See also: might, well

to put it another way

 and put another way
a phrase introducing a restatement of what someone, usually the speaker, has just said. Father: You're still very young, Tom. To put it another way, you don't have any idea about what you're getting into. John: Could you go back to your own room now, Tom? I have to study. Put another way, get out of here! Tom: Okay, okay. Don't get your bowels in an uproar!
See also: another, put, to, way
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

turn of phrase

A particular arrangement of words, as in I'd never heard that turn of phrase before, or An idiom can be described as a turn of phrase. This idiom alludes to the turning or shaping of objects (as on a lathe), a usage dating from the late 1600s.
See also: of, phrase, turn
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

to coin a phrase

You say to coin a phrase to show that you are using an expression that people will know. Stunned Jackson was, to coin a phrase, `sick as a parrot'. Note: To coin a new word means to invent it or use it for the first time. In this expression, the term is being used ironically.
See also: coin, phrase, to
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

to coin a phrase

1 said ironically when introducing a banal remark or cliché. 2 said when introducing a new expression or a variation on a familiar one.
See also: coin, phrase, to
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

to coin a ˈphrase

used for introducing an expression that you have invented or to apologize for using a well-known idiom or phrase instead of an original one: Oh well, no news is good news, to coin a phrase.
See also: coin, phrase, to

a ˌturn of ˈphrase

a particular way of saying something or describing something: She has a very amusing turn of phrase.
See also: of, phrase, turn
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

coin a phrase, to

To fashion an expression. This term, dating from the 1940s, is often used ironically to apologize for using a cliché, as in “He acts like the cock of the walk, to coin a phrase.” Of course it can also be used straightforwardly and refer to inventing an expression, a usage dating from the late 1500s.
See also: coin, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
For each of the two foregoing pattern conditions, groups of mice were subdivided and assigned to two phrasing conditions.
These patterns were presented with or without temporal phrasing cues, resulting in four conditions: Perfect Unphrased (PU), Perfect Phrased (PP), Violation Unphrased (VU), and Violation Phrased (VP) groups.
However, phrasing interfered with specific aspects of pattern learning in both the perfect pattern (the pattern having no violation element) and the violation pattern (the pattern containing a single violation element in the terminal position).
The results show that manipulations of phrasing and pattern structure had little effect on overall acquisition.
Significant interactions included structure x blocks, F(9, 108) = 5.08, and phrasing x blocks, F(9, 108) = 2.03.
Analysis showed that learning to respond appropriately on the first element of chunks was more difficult with phrasing cues than without them.
Rats in our lab show a similar pattern of results for phrased and unphrased patterns, and the results thus support the idea that phrasing cues generally reduce overextension errors for both rats and mice.
[To clarify, it is important to recall that patterns cycled without interruption (save for phrasing cues, where appropriate), so that the final two chunks of violation patterns, 781 and 818, were followed immediately by the first chunk of the next pattern, 123, resulting in a .
The initial musical "clue" to consider when looking for guidance in phrasing is the overall musical context of the work.
Meter is another aspect to consider, because projecting the character and feel of a particular meter can profoundly impact phrasing decisions.
Starting at measure 15, the phrasing should portray the grouping of 1-2, 1-2-3, 1-2, 1-2, 1-2-3, and so on.
Projecting the meter of a work is a key part of the work's identity and should guide all decisions about phrasing.
Another key to interpreting rhythm and phrasing is to understand the natural inflection of a rhythmic pattern.
To illustrate the effect duration has on phrasing, sing the following example (Example 10) twice, once with only a short "da" to represent the initial attack of each note, and once singing a long "da" for the fullest duration of each note.
Scrutinizing the rhythm of a given work will also reveal other clues to guide phrasing decisions.