phase

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Related to phasic: FASIC

go through a phase

To experience or be in the midst of a temporary period of change, development, or fluctuation. I went through a phase of being obsessed with superhero movies this summer. Timothy has been really aggressive and demanding lately, but I think he's just going through a phase.
See also: phase, through

honeymoon phase

The short amount of time at the beginning of a new relationship, activity, or pursuit when everything goes well and seems to be free of problems. Donna was excited when she started her new job, but once the honeymoon phase was over, she realized that she had more responsibilities than she could handle. Many couples find it difficult to maintain a relationship after the honeymoon phase ends.
See also: honeymoon, phase

phase out

To gradually eliminate or remove someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "phase" and "out." Of course I'm worried—the corporate office is phasing out all of the jobs in our department!
See also: out, phase

phase in

To introduce or implement (something) gradually, especially in distinct phases or stages. We've been phasing in a new company-wide policy to help deal with cyber security threats. The program was phased in over a period of 7 years, with the final implementation going live today.
See also: phase

phase someone or something into something

 and phase someone or something in
to work someone or something into use or service gradually. They decided to phase Ruth into the job little by little. They phased in Ruth over a long period of time.
See also: phase

phase someone or something out of something

 and phase someone or something out
to work someone or something out of use or service or out of a group gradually. We are going to have to phase you out of the job of treasurer. They phased out the unneeded workers.
See also: of, out, phase

in phase

Also, in sync. In a correlated or synchronized way; in accord, in harmony. For example, If everyone were in phase we could step up the schedule, or John and Pat often say the same thing at the same time; their minds are perfectly in sync . Both versions of this idiom refer to physical phenomena. The first, dating from the second half of the 1800s, alludes to being at the same stage in a series of movements. The second, a slangy abbreviation of synchronization dating from the mid-1900s, alludes to exact coincidence in the time or rate of movement. Also see in step; phase in; for the antonym, see out of phase.
See also: phase

out of phase

Also, out of sync. In an unsynchronized or uncorrelated way. For example, Inventory control and shipping are out of phase, so we can't rely on their figures, or The lights are out of sync and keep flashing at random. For dates, see the antonym in phase.
See also: of, out, phase

phase in

Introduce one stage at a time. For example, New technology must be phased in or the office will be overwhelmed. The antonym is phase out, meaning "to bring or come to an end, one stage at a time," as in The department is phasing out all the older computers. [Mid-1900s]
See also: phase

in ˈphase/out of ˈphase (with something)

(British English) working/not working together in the right way: The traffic lights were out of phase.
See also: of, out, phase

phase in

v.
To introduce something or someone gradually or in stages: The government is now phasing in a new immigration policy. We should phase the new regulations in slowly so that businesses can get used to them.
See also: phase

phase out

v.
To take something or someone out of service gradually or in stages: The company phased out the old model of vacuum cleaner, and it's hard to find any in the stores now. We will gradually phase the old schedule out to create a more efficient one.
See also: out, phase

phazed

and phased (fezd)
mod. intoxicated with marijuana. How much booze does it take you to get really phased?

phased

verb
See phazed
See also: phase

in phase

In a correlated or synchronized way.
See also: phase

out of phase

In an unsynchronized or uncorrelated way.
See also: of, out, phase
References in periodicals archive ?
Parameters related to phasic and tonic force were estimated from the force-time curves (Fig.
This basal force was subtracted from the force values to obtain the force developed during the phasic and tonic contractions.
However, with regard to the phasic component the situation is slightly different.
Large effects may decrease or even disappear if the sampling rate is below 10 Hz for the phasic component.
2005; Wray and Burdyga, 2010) is restricted to the phasic component.
The phasic component of the electrodermal activity was defined as any increase in skin conductance that was initiated within a time window from 1 to 5 s after stimulus onset.
Paul Ripley, founder of Phasic Labs Freelance programmer Sam Hall Christian Lavoie, left, and Jason Chown set up Setgo after leaving video games giant Sony Pictures: GAVIN TRAFFORD
As opposed to the reinforcement learning theory, the conflict monitoring theory supports the fact that ACC produces an additional excitability phasic response, N2 (N2 is produced by the neurons of ACC as a conflict monitor, while ERN is produced also by ACC as the control monitor), when it detects a pre-response conflict (10,25).
Kendall referred to exenatide and other incretin mimetics as "smart bombs for diabetes," since they lead to a "profound restoration of phasic insulin secretion," a decrease in postmeal glucose excursions, and reductions in hemoglobin [A.
Skin conductance response has been described in the literature as having two components: phasic and tonic responses (e.
As we will show in this review, these characteristics make fast-scan cyclic voltammetry ideal for measuring the phasic dopamine signals putatively associated with burst firing of dopamine neurons in awake animals.
REM sleep can be further subdivided into tonic and phasic periods.
EMG in the experimental rats showed phasic inspiratory activity in the PCA, but also in the TA and the LCA, normally electrically silent during breathing.