petard


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

hoist by/with (one's) own petard

To be injured, ruined, or defeated by one's own action, device, or plot that was intended to harm another; to have fallen victim to one's own trap or schemes. (Note: "hoist" in this instance is the simple past-tense of the archaic form of the verb, "hoise.") I tried to get my boss fired by planting drugs on him, but I was hoist by my own petard when the police caught me with them beforehand.
See also: by, hoist, own, petard

be hoist by (one's) own petard

To be injured, ruined, or defeated by one's own action, device, or plot that was intended to harm another; to have fallen victim to one's own trap or schemes. ("Hoist" in this instance is the simple past-tense of the archaic form of the verb, "hoise.") I tried to get my boss fired by planting drugs on him, but I was hoist by my own petard when the police caught me with them beforehand.
See also: by, hoist, own, petard

hoist with one's own petard

Fig. to be harmed or disadvantaged by an action of one's own which was meant to harm someone else. (From a line in Shakespeare's Hamlet.) She intended to murder her brother but was hoist with her own petard when she ate the poisoned food intended for him. The vandals were hoist with their own petard when they tried to make an emergency call from the pay phone they had broken.
See also: hoist, own, petard

hoist by your own petard

or

hoist with your own petard

FORMAL
If someone is hoist by their own petard or is hoist with their own petard, something they do to get an advantage or to harm someone else results in harm to themselves. You should stop spreading stories about your opponents or, sooner or later, you will be hoist with your own petard. Note: `Petards' were metal balls filled with gunpowder which were used to blow up walls or gates. The gunpowder was lit by a slow-burning fuse, but there was always a danger that the device would explode too soon and `hoist' the person lighting it, that is, blow them up in the air.
See also: by, hoist, own, petard

hoist with (or by) your own petard

have your plans to cause trouble for others backfire on you.
The phrase is from Shakespeare's Hamlet: ‘For 'tis the sport to have the enginer Hoist with his own petard’. In former times, a petard was a small bomb made of a metal or wooden box filled with explosive powder, while hoist here is the past participle of the dialect verb hoise , meaning ‘lift or remove’.
See also: hoist, own, petard

be hoist/hoisted by/with your own peˈtard

(British English) be caught in the trap that you were preparing for another personThis is from Shakespeare’s play Hamlet. A petard was a small bomb.
See also: by, hoist, own, petard

be hoist with one's own petard

To be undone by one's own schemes.
See also: hoist, own, petard

hoist by your own petard

Hurt by your own misdeed. A petard was a medieval bomb made of a container of gunpowder with a fuse, and to blow open gates during sieges against towns and fortresses. Unreliable, petards often exploded prematurely and sent the person who lit the fuse aloft (the “hoist” image) in one or more pieces. The phrase, which is often misquoted as “hoist on one's own petard,” comes from Hamlet: For 'tis the sport to have the engineer Hoist with his own petard; and ‘t shall go hard But I will delve one yard below their mines And blow them at the moon . . .
See also: by, hoist, own, petard
References in periodicals archive ?
I had a shattered pestle once," he confided, "but only because we had attached an explosive charge to it in an attempt to improve its performance by turning it into a petard.
An extra 236 metres will be built from Petard Close to Slingsby.
I think that's called being hoist by your own (terribly fashionable) petard, luv.
profited from special treatment by a brokerage firm under SEC investigation reminds one of the old saw, ``Hoisted (or at least embarrassed) by his own petard.
From the Oxford English Dictionary: petard is "a small engine of war used to blow in a door or gate.
En quatre minutes, le match a bascule : fumigenes lances sur la pelouse, petard qui explose aux pieds d'un stadier visiblement choque, bagarres entre fans croates dans les travees.
JUDGING from this evasive response to journalist's questions at the monthly Downing Street press conference at which he "repeatedly attempted to bat away the question of whether he wants to see Saddam Hussein hanged" (Daily Post, November 4), it is clear that much as he would like to see the extinguishing of Saddam as the beacon of continuing resistance to the illegal occupation of his country, Tony Blair has been hoist by his own petard over his own populist stance on capital punishment.
So much for supporting 'animal welfare' Mr Hobday, your own bigoted animal rights ethos has hoisted you by your own petard.
But by claiming bias, big Eck may be hoisted by his own petard.
Few know what it means, but all of us know exactly what we mean when we say with very gad grammar: 'A pedant - like Mr Green - was hoist by his own petard.
The HMS Petard sailor was posthumously awarded the George Cross for his actions which helped the Allies target enemy subs - and hide D-Day plans.
According to the official version, when, on October 30, 1942, the U-559 was depth-charged to the surface by HMS Petard on the convoy route from Port Said, Egypt, to Haifa, Palestine, the British destroyer's 35-yearold Lt-Commander Mark Thornton mounted an orderly snatch operation: he took Petard alongside the U-boat so that his men could jump onto the German vessel.
Others from the Bard's most celebrated play include: Hoisted By His Own Petard, Every Dog Has His Day and There's Method In His Madness.
La sanction du MCO fait suite aux jets de projectiles (bouteilles, pierres, petard et chaises de tribunes) survenus lors de la reception de l'USM Alger (2-1) dispute samedi dernier, dans le cadre de la 19e journee du championnat.