persuade (one) to (do something)

(redirected from persuading us to)

persuade (one) to (do something)

To convince, cajole, or coerce one into doing something. One time, when we were kids, my older brother persuaded me to lick dog feces because he said it would make me more manly. Go and have fun, but don't let anyone persuade you to do anything that you're not comfortable with.
See also: persuade, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

persuade someone to do something

to convince someone to do something. Are you sure I can't persuade you to have another piece of cake? Richard was easily persuaded to have another piece of his favorite cake.
See also: persuade, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
There's Kevin Bacon flogging digital products, Harvey Keitel persuading us to buy insurance, Robert De Niro pushing a famous bakery while George Clooney appeared in his own Channel 4 production of Catch-22.
Beryl has been integral in the work of persuading us to return to the area - not that we needed much persuading!
Obviously, this story is not persuading us to attempt walking across the Mersey!
This latest effort should have weight in persuading us to ditch those ready meals, as food writer Simon Hopkinson shares his tips on how to create restaurant-quality food at home.
But can there be a better way of persuading us to abandon our vehicles than these old photographs of what Brum used to be like before the motor car ruled?
EVEN though TV companies spend millions persuading us to tune into their shows every Christmas, many of us believe festive TV just isn't as good as it was back in the golden era of the 1960s and 1970s, when three channels dominated the airwaves.
THE ad campaign aimed at persuading us to take our holidays in Britain this summer is in full swing.
A subtle way of encouraging integration by persuading us to abandon our usually conservative clothes in favour of a more stylish pan-Euro mode of dressing.
Ironically, as a society, we have turned upside down the words of St Paul when writing to Timothy in the first century that "the love of money is the root of all kinds of evil," and have made our love of money into a way of persuading us to do what is right.