persuade (one) of (something)

(redirected from persuaded of)

persuade (one) of (something)

To convince, cajole, or coerce one into believing that something is true. My older brother could persuade me of anything when we were kids. One time, he got me to believe that the moon would fall on me if I didn't stay up the whole night! You'll have a harder time persuading the federal regulators of your story.
See also: of, persuade
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

persuade someone of something

to convince someone of something. Laura was unable to persuade me of the truth of her statement. We were all persuaded of the need for higher taxes.
See also: of, persuade
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
To round out these guidelines, we need to postulate a final "golden rule" of persuasion: The creators of a persuasive technology should never seek to persuade anyone of something they themselves would not consent to be persuaded of. We find support for this golden rule in the work of the 20th-century philosopher John Rawls, a Harvard professor who proposed in his landmark 1989 book A Theory of Justice that we consider ethics from behind a "veil of ignorance" [5].
Some people might want to persuade others and consent to being persuaded of things that many find objectionable, say, to abort a fetus.