personal

(redirected from personals)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

(it's) nothing personal

(This is) not based on emotions, subjective motivations, or personal biases; (this is) not meant to offend you; (this is) not a personal slight against you. Though it can be truthful, this phrase often tends to be sarcastic, insincere, or unconvincing in usage or reception. Larry: "But how can you fire me after 20 years' service, just like that?" Matt: "Nothing personal, Larry, it's just the way the business is moving right now." It's nothing personal, Dad. I just think it would be easier for all of us if you weren't at the wedding. Nothing personal, but your voice is really getting on my nerves.
See also: nothing, personal

up close and personal

1. adjective Very physically close to someone or something. Hyphenated if used before a noun. You'll have to get up close and personal to see all of the tiny details in the painting.
2. adjective Very intimate and personal, especially to an uncomfortable or unwanted degree. Hyphenated if used before a noun. I don't like it when guys try to get too up close and personal in our first couple of dates. I'd rather share my more intimate side with someone after we've been together for a little while. It will require an up-close-and-personal doctor's examination to be sure there aren't any signs of infection.
3. adverb In a very close and intimate manner or to such a degree. The auditors got to know our financial habits very up close and personal. The biologist has been investigating the dietary habits of the local bear population up close and personal, observing their movements and examining samples of their fecal matter.
See also: and, close, personal, up

up close and personal

phr. intimately; more intimately than one might have wished for. (Colloq. The phrase has been the title of a movie and the name of a television show.) When my trunks slipped down, she got to know me a little more up close and personal that we were ready for at that moment.
See also: and, close, personal, up
References in classic literature ?
"My personal independence is as important to me as yours is to you.
The being of God in a personal or impersonal form was a mental necessity to the first thinkers of modern times: from this alone all other ideas could be deduced.
The system of Spinoza is less personal and also less dualistic than that of Descartes.
We by no means intend to abolish this personal appropriation of the products of labour, an appropriation that is made for the maintenance and reproduction of human life, and that leaves no surplus wherewith to command the labour of others.
To invite personal combat, therefore, denotes confidence in his own swordsmanship, and great courage, two attributes that were calculated to fill the Black players with hope and valor when evinced by their Chief thus early in the game.
Had he any personal objection to trying his luck with Mrs.
The popular notion certainly adds a condition of ease and fortune; but that is a natural result of personal force and love, that they should possess and dispense the goods of the world.
It is known that a woman named Anne Catherick, and bearing an extraordinary personal resemblance to Lady Glyde, escaped from the Asylum; it is known that the person received there last July was received as Anne Catherick brought back; it is known that the gentleman who brought her back warned Mr.
Our personal life was as free as that of our instructors.
As it was, he impressed himself professionally on Europe to an extent that made his comparative personal obscurity, and the failure of Oxford to do justice to his eminence, a puzzle to foreign specialists in his subject.
It is too true, however disgraceful it may be to human nature, that nations in general will make war whenever they have a prospect of getting anything by it; nay, absolute monarchs will often make war when their nations are to get nothing by it, but for the purposes and objects merely personal, such as thirst for military glory, revenge for personal affronts, ambition, or private compacts to aggrandize or support their particular families or partisans.
It is that which, being the immediate and visible guardian of life and property, having its benefits and its terrors in constant activity before the public eye, regulating all those personal interests and familiar concerns to which the sensibility of individuals is more immediately awake, contributes, more than any other circumstance, to impressing upon the minds of the people, affection, esteem, and reverence towards the government.