perfect

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Related to perfects: Perfect numbers
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inch-perfect

Extremely accurate; very well placed or perfectly judged. (Used especially of maneuvers, moves, or shots in sport.) Primarily heard in UK. With only a few seconds left, the striker managed an inch-perfect goal from midfield.

let (the) perfect be the enemy of (the) good

To allow the demand, desire, or insistence for perfection decrease the chances of obtaining a good or favorable result in the end. (Usually used in the negative as an imperative.) I know you want your research paper to be great, but don't let perfect be the enemy of good, or you won't even finish it in time! As a manager, you have to realize both the potential and the limits of your employees, so be sure not to let the perfect be the enemy of the good.
See also: enemy, good, let, of, perfect

perfect storm

A chance or rare combination of individual elements, circumstances, or events that together form a disastrous, catastrophic, or extremely unpleasant problem or difficulty. The incumbent mayor's re-election campaign is getting underway amidst a perfect storm of allegations and news stories about corruption, tax evasion, and racketeering within the city's government. The oil crisis has set off a perfect storm in the Middle East, where foreign leaders have depended on its economic stability to keep their warring countries from absolute chaos and anarchy.
See also: perfect, storm

pitch-perfect

Reaching or conveying the exactly right note or tone. The phrase refers to music but it is often applied to writing and other things. After her pitch-perfect rendition, I definitely think we should ask Meredith to join the choir. This is a pitch-perfect parody of Hemingway's writing style, don't you think?

picture perfect

Exactly as desired in every detail. Often hyphenated. My goodness, what a party. Everything was picture perfect. She's obsessed with having a picture-perfect wedding.
See also: perfect, picture

practice makes perfect

Practicing or repeatedly doing something will make one become proficient or skillful at it. A: "I just can't seem to get the rhythm of this song quire right." B: "Keep at it—practice makes perfect!" You can't expect to start a new sport and be amazing at it right away. As is always the case, practice makes perfect.
See also: make, perfect, practice

in a perfect world

If things existed or happened exactly as one would like. Well, in a perfect world I'd be able to take time off for paternity leave without having it affect my pay, but at least I get to take the time off at all! Well, we'd be able to provide healthcare services to every citizen without charge in a perfect world, but unfortunately that's never going to happen.
See also: perfect, world

in an ideal world

If things existed or happened exactly as one would like. Well, in an ideal world I'd be able to take time off for paternity leave without having it affect my pay, but at least I get to take the time off at all! Well, we'd be able to provide healthcare services to every citizen without charge in an ideal world, but unfortunately that's never going to happen.
See also: ideal, world

match for (someone or something)

1. Someone who is well suited to someone else, especially as a romantic partner. We're actually a perfect match for one another, despite our differences in personality—maybe even because of those differences. I think he would be a good match for you—just go on one date and see how you get on!
2. Someone who able to stand up to or compete against someone else with equal strength or skill. Often used in negative constructions. They've had an impressive run this season, but the young team is just no match for the returning champions. No one put much faith in the young defense attorney, but he has proven a match for the state prosecutor.
See also: match

perfect stranger

Someone with whom one has absolutely no previous association. My mom and dad didn't come to see our son until he was nearly three years old, so, to him, they were perfect strangers! She thought it was terribly funny to go up to perfect strangers and begin conversations with them as if they had been lifelong friends.
See also: perfect, stranger

perfect stranger

 and total stranger
Fig. a person who is completely unknown [to oneself]. I was stopped on the street by a perfect stranger who wanted to know my name. If a total stranger asked me such a personal question, I am sure I would not answer!
See also: perfect, stranger

picture perfect

Fig. looking exactly correct or right. (Hyphenated as a modifier.) At last, everything was picture perfect. Nothing less than a picture-perfect party table will do.
See also: perfect, picture

Practice makes perfect.

Prov. Cliché Doing something over and over again is the only way to learn to do it well. Jill: I'm not going to try to play the piano anymore. I always make so many mistakes. Jane: Don't give up. Practice makes perfect. Child: How come you're so good at peeling potatoes? Father: I did it a lot in the army, and practice makes perfect.
See also: make, perfect, practice

practice makes perfect

Frequently doing something makes one better at doing it, as in I've knit at least a hundred sweaters, but in my case practice hasn't made perfect. This proverbial expression was once put as Use makes mastery, but by 1560 the present form had become established.
See also: make, perfect, practice

practice makes perfect

COMMON People say practice makes perfect to mean that if you practise something enough, you will eventually be able to do it perfectly. It is like learning to ride a bike. You may fall off a few times but practice makes perfect.
See also: make, perfect, practice

practice makes perfect

regular exercise of an activity or skill is the way to become proficient in it.
See also: make, perfect, practice

ˌpractice makes ˈperfect

(saying) a way of encouraging people by telling them that if you do an activity regularly you will become very good at it: If you want to learn a language, speak it as much as you can. Practice makes perfect!
See also: make, perfect, practice

in an ˌideal/a ˌperfect ˈworld

used to say that something is what you would like to happen or what should happen, but you know it cannot: In an ideal world we would be recycling and reusing everything.
See also: ideal, perfect, world

letter perfect

Correct in every detail; verbatim. The term comes from the nineteenth-century stage, in which actors were told to memorize their parts precisely to the letter of every word. It probably evolved from an earlier expression, to the letter, which had very much the same meaning. “I will obey you to the letter,” wrote Byron (Sardanapalus, 1821).
See also: letter, perfect

picture perfect

Exactly right, especially in appearance. This term, from the twentieth century, alludes to the precise resemblance of a painting or photograph to its subject, as in “The day was picture perfect for a picnic—not a cloud in the sky.” Time magazine used the term as the caption for a photograph of the presidential candidate Al Gore, his wife Tipper, running mate Joe Lieberman, and Lieberman’s wife Hadassah, calling it “the purest moment of their campaign” (Aug. 21, 2000).
See also: perfect, picture

practice makes perfect

The more one does something, the better at it one becomes. This ancient proverb began as use makes perfect. In English it dates from the fifteenth century but probably was a version of a much older Latin proverb. It exists in many languages, so presumably most people agree. Ralph Waldo Emerson almost did: “Practice is nine-tenths,” he wrote (Conduct of Life: Power, 1860). An English writer in the Spectator of May 10, 1902, differed: “Practice never makes perfect. It improves up to a point.”
See also: make, perfect, practice
References in classic literature ?
With these facts, here far too briefly and imperfectly given, which show that there is much graduated diversity in the eyes of living crustaceans, and bearing in mind how small the number of living animals is in proportion to those which have become extinct, I can see no very great difficulty (not more than in the case of many other structures) in believing that natural selection has converted the simple apparatus of an optic nerve merely coated with pigment and invested by transparent membrane, into an optical instrument as perfect as is possessed by any member of the great Articulate class.
Thy sensible frame, too, shall soon be all perfect."
As the last crimson tint of the birthmark--that sole token of human imperfection--faded from her cheek, the parting breath of the now perfect woman passed into the atmosphere, and her soul, lingering a moment near her husband, took its heavenward flight.
By selecting for his illustrations one feature from one lady and another from another, Messer Firenzuola builds up an ideal of the Beautiful Woman, which, were she to be possible, would probably be as faultily faultless as the Perfect Woman, were she possible.
Moreover, much about the same time as Firenzuola was writing, Botticelli's blonde, angular, retrousse women were breaking every one of that beauty- master's canons, perfect in beauty none the less; and lovers then, and perhaps particularly now, have found the perfect beauty in faces to which Messer Firenzuola would have denied the name of face at all, by virtue of a quality which indeed he has tabulated, but which is far too elusive and undefinable, too spiritual for him truly to have understood,--a quality which nowadays we are tardily recognising as the first and last of all beauty, either of nature or art,--the supreme, truly divine, because materialistically unaccountable, quality of Charm!
Aorists and Perfects: Synchronic and Diachronic Perspectives
Linguists from Europe and North America continue the examination of aorists and perfects that began in the previous volume of the series.
ENPNewswire-July 31, 2019--Mondelez International Completes Acquisition of Majority Interest in Perfect Snacks
Release date- 30072019 - DEERFIELD, Ill - Mondelez International today announced it has completed its previously announced agreement to acquire a majority interest in Perfect Snacks, a pioneer in the fast-growing refrigerated nutrition bars segment with a range of offerings including Perfect Bar, The Original Refrigerated Protein Bar, and Perfect Snacks' other lines of organic, non-GMO, nut-butter based protein bars and bites.
"The Perfect Stone" is a beautiful example of storytelling to illustrate positive values and virtues.
Perfect additions to barbecues, pool parties, and any backyard fun, the products in the 2016 Nerf Dude Perfect and Super Soaker lines bring friendly, fun-filled competition for all ages.
Perfect Sweet announces the launch of a new, completely natural, low carb, low GI sweetener with a host of health benefits, making it perfect for dieters, diabetics, children, dental patients, mums-to-be and women at high risk of osteoporosis--as well as anyone concerned about oral health and general well-being.
This makes Perfect Sweet ideal for those on low GI diets, as well as diabetics who need to keep their blood sugar stable.