pepper with

pepper with

1. To sprinkle, dot, or cover something with a lot of something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pepper" and "with." Birds have peppered the various statues with poo, making for some very unsightly tourist attractions. Their entire house has been peppered with their kids' toys—you can't walk anywhere without tripping over something!
2. To add a lot of something interspersed or intermixed into something else, especially something spoken such as a story, speech, lecture, etc. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pepper" and "with." He always peppered his lessons with funny anecdotes and skits to help the students really engage with the material. My uncle can't tell a story without peppering it with various embellishments and mistruths.
3. To shower or rain down on someone or something with small projectiles or missiles. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pepper" and "with." Riot police peppered the protestors with rubber bullets and tear gas.
See also: pepper

pepper someone or something with something

to shower someone or something with something, such as stones, bullets, etc. The angry crowd peppered the police with stones. The sheriff's posse peppered the bandit's hideout with bullets.
See also: pepper

pepper with

v.
1. To intersperse something with something else, especially to make it more exciting, interesting, or colorful: She peppers her stories with interesting details. Our vacation consisted of long days at the beach peppered with exciting trips to the city.
2. To sprinkle liberally with something; dot with something: The kids have peppered the backyard with lost marbles.
3. To be sparsely distributed across something; dot something. Used in the passive: The green plain was peppered with small yellow shrubs.
4. To attack someone or something with or as if with small missiles: The attackers peppered the castle wall with a hail of bullets.
See also: pepper
References in classic literature ?
Pepper with such fierceness that both ladies looked up at him.
As evident from Table 2, about 63.0% of the sampled respondents cultivated sole pepper with a mean farm size of 0.93ha, and the enterprise combinations included pepper/maize (6.67%) with a mean farm size of 0.93ha, pepper/cassava (13.3%) with a mean farm size of 0.96ha, pepper/tomato (7.5%) with a mean farm size of 1.47ha, and pepper/maize/cassava (10.0%) with a mean farm size of 1.66ha.
Processing is only in the form of parboiling, that is partly cooked by boiling the pepper with palm oil after which it is sun-dried in order to reduce the water content that contributes to its perishability, but the sun-dried pepper seeds could not be used for subsequent production due to the termination of the life of the living cells of the pepper fruit.
It's best not to confuse this pepper with the chili pepper introduced to Asia later from the New World.
Stuffed pepper with watercress pesto (2) INGREDIENTS: To make the stuffed pepper: 1 yellow pepper, cut in half, seeds and stalk removed; 1tbsp olive oil; 55g/2oz cherry tomatoes, cut in half; 55g/2oz feta cheese, crumbled; salt and freshly ground black pepper.
Stuff each pepper with about 2 to 3 tablespoons of the meat filling, close with a toothpick, and set down on a dish.
Eating cayenne pepper with meals may mitigate a hormonal response that's linked to diabetes, a trial of two diets suggests.
RELATED ARTICLE: Beer-Battered Anaheim Pepper with Lobster (Serves 6)
To select a pepper with the right amount of spiciness for your taste, use the chart on the opposite page.
Stuffed pepper with watercress pesto (2) INGREDIENTS: To make the stuffed pepper: 1 yellow pepper, cut in half, seeds and stalk removed; 1tbsp good quality olive oil; 55g/2oz cherry tomatoes, cut in half; 55g/2oz feta cheese, crumbled; salt and freshly ground black pepper.