pennyworth

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put in (one's) two pennyworth

To share one's opinion, idea, or point of view, regardless of whether or not others want to hear it. ("Pennyworth" is a contraction of "pennies' worth.") Primarily heard in UK. Jeff always has to put in his two pennyworth, even when it's clear he knows nothing about what's being discussed. If I can just put in my two pennyworth, I think the staff would really appreciate a bump in their pay, and productivity would increase as a result.
See also: pennyworth, put, two

put in your two ˈpennyworth/ˈpenn’orth

(British English) (American English put in your two ˈcents’ worth) (informal) give your opinion about something, even if other people do not want to hear it: I expect you’ve already made up your mind, but I’ll put in my two pennyworth anyway.The public will get a chance to put in their two cents’ worth at a public hearing.
See also: pennyworth, put, two
References in classic literature ?
Such zests as his particular little phial of cayenne pepper and his pennyworth of pickles in a saucer, were not wanting.
The pudding at that shop was made of currants, and was rather a special pudding, but was dear, twopennyworth not being larger than a pennyworth of more ordinary pudding.
The cottage loaf and the pennyworth of milk had been set forth on a sheet of paper on the window-seat.
If we went round the moon it would not make a pennyworth of difference to me or to my work.
Weevle, who is a handy good-for-nothing kind of young fellow, borrows a needle and thread of Miss Flite and a hammer of his landlord and goes to work devising apologies for window-curtains, and knocking up apologies for shelves, and hanging up his two teacups, milkpot, and crockery sundries on a pennyworth of little hooks, like a shipwrecked sailor making the best of it.
Not content with this, he captured the floating policeman and induced him to stand opposite the entrance and watch it; and finally paused an instant for a pennyworth of chestnuts, and an inquiry as to the probable length of the merchant's stay in the neighbourhood.
Tom's new purse and money burnt in his pocket; he wondered, as they toddled through the quadrangle and along the street, whether East would be insulted if he suggested further extravagance, as he had not sufficient faith in a pennyworth of potatoes.