penny-wise and pound-foolish

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penny-wise and pound-foolish

So concerned with saving money in any way possible that one fails to allocate money to things that will ultimately force one to spend more (due to lack of quality, proper maintenance, etc). I know you don't want to pay for this expensive course of treatment, but when ignoring your health lands you in the hospital and you have to miss work, you'll see that you were penny-wise and pound-foolish.
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penny-wise and pound-foolish

Prov. thrifty with small sums and foolish with large sums. (Describes someone who will go to a lot of trouble to save a little money, but overlooks large expenses to save a little money. Even in the United States, the reference is to British pounds sterling.) Sam: If we drive to six different grocery stores, we'll get the best bargains on everything we buy. Alan: But with gasoline so expensive, that's penny-wise and pound-foolish.
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penny wise and pound foolish

Stingy about small expenditures and extravagant with large ones, as in Dean clips all the coupons for supermarket bargains but insists on going to the best restaurants-penny wise and pound foolish . This phrase alludes to British currency, in which a pound was once worth 240 pennies, or pence, and is now worth 100 pence. The phrase is also occasionally used for being very careful about unimportant matters and careless about important ones. It was used in this way by Joseph Addison in The Spectator (1712): "A woman who will give up herself to a man in marriage where there is the least Room for such an apprehension ... may very properly be accused ... of being penny wise and pound foolish." [c. 1600]
See also: and, foolish, penny, pound, wise

penny-wise and pound-foolish

mainly BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
If someone is penny-wise and pound-foolish, they are very careful about small amounts of money but not careful enough about large amounts. If we had employed a good accountant, we would never have lost the money. In other words, we have been penny-wise and pound-foolish here. We are being penny wise and pound foolish, trying to save a few dollars and hastening the time when we are going to have another accident.
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penny wise and pound foolish

careful and economical in small matters while being wasteful or extravagant in large ones.
See also: and, foolish, penny, pound, wise

penny ˌwise (and) pound ˈfoolish

used to say that somebody is very careful about small matters but much less sensible about larger, more important things: When it comes to a used car, don’t be penny wise and pound foolish. Spend the money to have the vehicle checked out.
See also: foolish, penny, pound, wise

penny wise and pound foolish

Penurious about small expenses and extravagant with large ones. That such a course is to be deplored was already made clear in the sixteenth century and was soon transferred to the foolishness of being fastidious about unimportant matters and careless about important ones. In The Spectator of 1712 Joseph Addison wrote, “I think a Woman who will give up herself to a Man in marriage, where there is the least Room for such an Apprehension . . . may very properly be accused . . . of being Penny Wise and Pound foolish.”
See also: and, foolish, penny, pound, wise
References in periodicals archive ?
returns to Derry, Maine to look at the band of unlikely heroes -- the so-called Losers Club -- who must unite after 27 years, following the bloody events of 1989, and take down Pennywise for good.
Bill Skarsgard also returned to portray the evil Pennywise.
Pennywise is there, jumping on walls with his tongue sticking out and playing on our biggest insecurities and fears.
Banding together over one horrifying and exhilarating summer, the Losers form a close bond to help them overcome their own fears and stop a killing cycle that began on a rainy day, with a small boy chasing a paper boat as it swept down a storm drainand into the hands of Pennywise the Clown.
Stephen King's It -- from the horror maestro's bestseller, already turned into a TV mini-series in 1990 -- is a clown, name of Pennywise, who preys on the little town of Derry, an unfortunate place where people "die or disappear at six times the national average" (and that's just the adults; the kids are even worse).
The movie features Pennywise the Dancing Clown who terrorises the US town of Derry in Maine luring children to their death from his lair in the sewers using red balloons.
It, for the uninitiated, is the story of seven adults who return to their hometown to destroy an evil they fought off before as children, largely represented as one Pennywise, the Dancing Clown.
Examples include S&M clowns, Bozo, Pennywise, clowns who abduct children, Obnoxio, the Joker, troll clowns, dip clowns, and many more.
* "The Maze Runner's" Will Poulter is set to play Pennywise the clown in the feature remake of "It."
The 2011 Pennywise Cabernet Sauvignon, sourced from three California wine districts, will be snapped up by those whose taste runs to lots of juicy fruit and who don't care a fig for structure.
The Northampton Clown, unmasked as film student Alex Powell by The Sunday People, appeared on TV news all over the world after dressing as Stephen King villain Pennywise and posing in the East Midlands town.
Hyderabad Ogilvy & Mather takes stake in PennyWise Ogilvy & Mather is to take a majority stake in PennyWise, adigitaltechnologyandpro- ductioncompanybasedin Hyderabad, India.
12 September 2013 - UK communications services major WPP Plc (LON:WPP) said today its wholly-owned global marketing communications unit Ogilvy & Mather had agreed to buy an unspecified majority stake in Indian digital technology and production company PennyWise Solutions Private Ltd.
For much of the book, it takes the form of 'Mr Pennywise', a clown.
Youth of Today, 7 Seconds, GBH, and Pennywise closed out the last day.