pencil


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pencil whip

1. To complete a form or record, especially a checklist, without doing the work required or by providing falsified or incomplete information. It has come to light that the safety supervisor aboard the oil rig had been pencil whipping his observational reports for several weeks leading up to the disaster.
2. To approve such a form without actually verifying that the contents are accurate or properly completed. We're supposed to fill out a detailed checklist after each shift, but I know my boss just pencil whips them.
See also: pencil, whip

pencil neck

1. A particularly weak, meek, or unimpressive person; a wimp. No little pencil neck like you is going to give me orders, pal!
2. A person who is very inclined toward academic or intellectual pursuits. I always made sure to make friends with the pencil necks in my math classes so they would help me out with the homework.
See also: neck, pencil

pencil-necked

1. Particularly weak, meek, or unimpressive; wimpy. No pencil-necked twerp like you is going to give me orders, pal!
2. Very inclined toward academic or intellectual pursuits. I always made sure to make friends with the pencil-necked geeks in my math classes so they would help me out with the homework.

pencil pusher

One who has a boring, meaningless office job. Primarily heard in US. I refuse to be a pencil pusher the rest of my life. I have big dreams and goals!
See also: pencil, pusher

put lead in (one's) pencil

To increase, enhance, or restore a man's sexual ability or vigor. You should try bungie-jumping at least once in your life—it will put lead in your pencil! The only real way to put lead in your pencil is to eat well, exercise regularly, and have self-confidence.
See also: lead, pencil, put

pencil (something) in

1. To write something down in pencil, especially with the view that it can or will be changed later. Why don't we just pencil in the dates we'd like, and we can go back and change them if they're not available? Pencil in your answers, and I'll check them when I'm done with work.
2. To schedule or plan something for a tentative or temporary time or date. Let's pencil in the meeting for December 15th—if there are any issues with the date, we can always change it. They're going to pencil the appointment in for 2 PM.
See also: pencil

pencil (one) in

To give someone an appointment for a tentative or temporary time or date. I need to have a date in the system, so I'll just pencil you in for the middle of July—just change it online once you've picked a date you're happy with. They penciled us in for 2 PM, but if we can't make it we have to let them know in advance.
See also: pencil

in pencil

written or signed with a pencil. Why did you write your report in pencil? You can't sign a check in pencil!
See also: pencil

pencil someone or something in

to write in something with a pencil. (Implies that the writing is not final.) This isn't a firm appointment yet, so I will just pencil it in. I penciled in a tentative answer.
See also: pencil

put lead in one's pencil

Enhance or restore sexual vigor, as in Try one of these hot peppers; that'll put lead in your pencil. This phrase, a euphemism for causing an erection, is considered far more vulgar than the contemporary synonym put hair on one's chest, alluding to a secondary male sex characteristic. [Colloquial; c. 1900]
See also: lead, pencil, put

put lead in your pencil

BRITISH, INFORMAL, OLD-FASHIONED, RUDE
If someone says that something puts lead in a man's pencil, they are suggesting humorously that it improves his sexual ability. Note: Lead is a very heavy metal. Steve chewed the tobacco and spat a brown spot into the snow. `Puts lead in your pencil,' he said. Note: You can also say that someone has lead in their pencil, to praise their sexual ability. He'd been blessed with amazing stamina and a lot of lead in his pencil. Note: The lead in a pencil is the part in the centre which makes a mark on paper.
See also: lead, pencil, put

a pen pusher

mainly BRITISH or

a pencil pusher

AMERICAN or

a paper pusher

COMMON If you describe someone as a pen pusher or a pencil pusher, you mean that they have a boring office job and do not make any important decisions. People who used to be called administrators, and perhaps seen as just pen pushers, have been transformed into senior managers. Many of the men who now sit on company boards are pencil pushers with qualifications from top schools, but lack experience in business. Note: In both American and British English, you can also call someone a paper pusher. I didn't want to be just another faceless paper pusher. Note: You can refer to office work as pen-pushing, pencil-pushing, or paper-pushing. You can also say that office workers push papers or push pens. I want our police officers freed from paper-pushing. I'm very thankful that I can make a living from my art, rather than working as a waiter or pushing papers eight hours a day.
See also: pen, pusher

lead in your pencil

vigour or energy, especially sexual energy in a man. informal
1972 Dan Lees Zodiac The couscous is supposed to put lead in your pencil but with Daria I needed neither a talking point nor an aphrodisiac.
See also: lead, pencil

pencil in

v.
1. To write something in with a pencil: The assistant penciled in the editorial changes on the manuscript. After the teacher reviewed my test, I penciled the corrections in.
2. To schedule something tentatively: The secretary penciled in a staff meeting for 3:00. The band penciled a rehearsal in on Friday.
3. To schedule a tentative appointment with someone: We penciled him in for lunch next Monday. The interviewers penciled in the applicant for the end of the week.
See also: pencil

have lead in one’s pencil

1. tv. to be vigorous and active. (Widely known phrase. Not taboo.) Your problem, Tom, is that you should have more lead in your pencil. You just don’t have the stamina.
2. tv. to have an erection of the penis. (Usually objectionable.) Due to his drinking habits, he never has any lead in his pencil.
See also: have, lead, pencil

pencil-pusher

n. a bureaucrat; a clerk; an office worker. (see also paper-pusher.) Look here, you lousy pencil-pusher, I want to talk to your boss!
References in classic literature ?
There were only four stationers of any consequences in the town, and at each Holmes produced his pencil chips, and bid high for a duplicate.
At the same moment the woman laid down the pencil and rose slowly to her feet.
As certainly as I had seen the woman, so certainly I had seen her, with my pencil in her hand, writing in my book.
Only could be heard the steady scratching of the pencil.
Barton's, were bent over the table and following the pencil.
Matthew twenty-third; 13--14 and 23," he wrote; then, with a gesture of impatience, he dropped his pencil and pulled toward him a magazine left on the desk by his wife a few minutes before.
while across the smooth white paper before him his pencil fairly flew--after first drawing one black line through Matthew twenty-third; 13--14 and 23.
Grewgious, referring to his notes, disposing of 'Marriage' with his pencil, and taking a paper from his pocket; 'although.
I have now, my dear,' he added, blurring out 'Will' with his pencil, 'discharged myself of what is doubtless a formal duty in this case, but still a duty in such a case.
The only noticeable thing about this brief communication was that it was written in yellow pencil of a peculiar shade.
He produced a huge old-fashioned leather pocket-book, with a pencil of dimensions to match.
Here I am, with my book and my pencil-- the latter not pointed so well as I could wish, but when Christians take leave of their senses, who is to expect that pencils will keep their points?
This Wakem was a pale, puny fellow, and it was quite clear he would not be able to play at anything worth speaking of; but he handled his pencil in an enviable manner, and was apparently making one thing after another without any trouble.
As soon as the jury had a little recovered from the shock of being upset, and their slates and pencils had been found and handed back to them, they set to work very diligently to write out a history of the accident, all except the Lizard, who seemed too much overcome to do anything but sit with its mouth open, gazing up into the roof of the court.
A curious collection, not of lead pencils, but of the lead out of lead pencils.