pedestal

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knock (one) off (one's) pedestal

1. To cause one to lose a leading or prominent position. At the end of the day, I think voters just wanted to knock the prime minister off his pedestal.
2. To reduce or damage one's ego or pride; to humble or humiliate one. I'm really glad that pompous oaf lost his court case—maybe that will knock him off his pedestal. It's about time someone knocked Sarah off her pedestal. Her snotty, rich-kid arrogance is intolerable!
See also: knock, off, pedestal

knock (one) off (one's) perch

To cause one to fall from a leading or prominent position. At the end of the day, I think voters just wanted to knock the prime minister off his perch.
See also: knock, off, perch

on a pedestal

In a position of being revered, honored, or thought of as perfect, especially due to blind devotion. I know it's easy to be smitten with a romantic partner, but I don't think it's healthy for one person in a relationship to put the other up on a pedestal like that. I think you put a lot of these old movies up on a pedestal out of nostalgia more than anything else.
See also: on, pedestal

place (someone or something) (up) on a pedestal

To believe or behave as if someone or something is perfect, wonderful, or better than others, to the extent that one is unable to see the potential flaws or faults of that person or thing. You know how Tiffany places him up on a pedestal—it's useless trying to get her to see that he's a jerk. Stephen has been placing classic literature on a pedestal ever since college, so he gets really judgmental of other genres he deems to be inferior.
See also: on, pedestal, place

put (someone or something) (up) on a pedestal

To believe or behave as if someone or something is perfect, wonderful, or better than others, to the extent that one is unable to see its potential flaws or faults. I know it's easy to be smitten with a romantic partner, but it isn't healthy to put someone up on a pedestal. Stephen has been putting classic literature on a pedestal ever since college, so he gets really judgmental of other genres he deems to be inferior.
See also: on, pedestal, put

set (someone or something) (up) on a pedestal

To believe or behave as if someone or something is perfect, wonderful, or better than others, to the extent that one is unable to see the potential flaws or faults of that person or thing. I know it's easy to be smitten with a romantic partner, but I don't think it's healthy for one to set the other up on a pedestal. Stephen has been setting classic literature on a pedestal ever since college, so he gets really judgmental of other genres he deems to be inferior.
See also: on, pedestal, set
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

*on a pedestal

Fig. elevated to a position of honor or reverence. (Alludes to honoring someone on display on a pedestal like a statue. *Typically: place someone ~; put someone ~.) He puts his wife on a pedestal. She can do no wrong in his opinion. I was just doing my job. There is no point in placing me on a pedestal!
See also: on, pedestal
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

on a pedestal, put

Also, set on a pedestal. Greatly admire, magnify in importance, as in Youngsters tend to put rock stars on a pedestal, forgetting that they're human. This expression alludes to the raised position of a statue on a pedestal. [Mid-1800s]
See also: on, put
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

knock someone off their pedestal

or

knock someone from their pedestal

If someone or something knocks you off your pedestal or knocks you from your pedestal, they show people that you are not perfect or as good as they thought. Note: A pedestal is a base on which something such as a statue stands. He has been knocked off his pedestal by revelations about his private life. The tabloids have been trying for several years now to knock Jackson from his pedestal. Note: Other verbs such as push, take, and force can be used instead of knock. Many film stars of that generation were forced off their pedestal by the arrival of sound. Note: This expression is very variable. For example, you can say that someone falls off their pedestal if they do something that shows people that they are not perfect or that they should come down from their pedestal if you think that they should stop behaving as though they think they are perfect. If you are the best student one year, there is a danger of falling off your pedestal the next year. My advice to Paula is to come down from her pedestal and get in touch with reality.
See also: knock, off, pedestal, someone

put someone on a pedestal

COMMON If someone puts you on a pedestal, they believe that you are perfect. Note: A pedestal is a base on which something such as a statue stands. I put my own parents on a pedestal. I felt they could do no wrong. Note: Other verbs such as place or set can be used instead of put. He had set her on a pedestal. Note: You can say that someone is on a pedestal or sits on a pedestal when people think of them in this way. The Emperor is still safely on a pedestal.
See also: on, pedestal, put, someone
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

put someone on a pedestal

admire someone greatly but uncritically.
See also: on, pedestal, put, someone
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

knock somebody off their ˈperch/ˈpedestal

show that somebody does not deserve to be admired so much: These revelations will really knock him off his pedestal.

put/set/place somebody on a ˈpedestal

admire somebody so much that you are unable to see their faults: Don’t try to put her on a pedestal, she’s as guilty as the rest of them! OPPOSITE: look down your nose (at somebody/something)
A pedestal is the base that a statue rests on.
See also: on, pedestal, place, put, set, somebody
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

set on a pedestal, to

To idealize; to glorify. This term alludes to the custom of worshiping the figures of saints and other notable individuals, which are literally placed on pedestals. It was used more generally from the mid-nineteenth century on. James Joyce had it in Ulysses (1922), “They discovered . . . that their idol had feet of clay, after putting him upon a pedestal.” See also feet of clay.
See also: on, set, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Orbit's integrated solution of onboard Multi-Purpose Terminal (MPT 87) satcom terminals and AL-4018 high-speed ground pedestals will provide both beyond-line-of-sight (BLOS) and line-of-sight (LOS) connectivity and tracking for IAI's next-generation medium-altitude, long-endurance (MALE) unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV).
It was not until 2014 that the council became aware that the urns and pedestals had been removed.
A woman trying to take a selfie with the artwork on display at the gallery knocked over a pedestal, which in turn fell on several others, setting the gallery back by $200,000, (http://mashable.com/2017/07/13/14th-factory-selfie-art-fail/?utm_cid=mash-com-Tw-main-link#LoPQY.zNeiq8) reports said .  
To take delivery of the pedestals and other parts of the Wheel throughout the construction process, a $3 million temporary dock was built by local Staten Island firm, Reicon Group LLC.
* Along with 2016-17 research commitments, the Concrete Research Council has announced Interface Shear Transfer of Lightweight Aggregate Concretes with Different Lightweight Aggregates and Evaluation of Seismic Performance Factors and Pedestal Shear Strength in Elevated Water Storage Tanks.
Valenti describes a world that creates a wholly unrealistic pedestal for feminists to sit upon.
If you've had a similar experience and wondered how you can achieve the same display and appreciation for your treasured sculpture pieces, look no further than Pease Pedestals. Celebrating 20 years of creating beautiful acrylic fabrication, Pease Pedestals has established itself as a premier U.S.
"NAB also allows us vital time to learn more about the needs of our US and global customers, while sharing our latest solutions such as our new pneumatic pedestal and rail system.
Robotic pedestals were not an option, said Wiedenheft.
According to a report in New Scientist, a comprehensive catalogue of the objects is lending weight to the idea that the pedestals may conceal ice-rich soil from previous eras, when the planet's spin axis tilted at a different angle than it does today.
The company prints and installs covers bearing suppliers' or retailers' advertising messages on security pedestals, ensuring that every customer who enters the store sees them.
That's your minimum size for the pedestals. You can make them longer and wider if you want the extra space to stand on to reach overhead shelving or to set the laundry baskets on.
The Sensormatic Ultra Exit AMS-1121 Detection System provides retailers with nearly eight feet of coverage between pedestals. It provides both audible and visual antitheft alarms and can also collect operational data, such as traffic counts.
Pedestals, as Gerstein (Acting Curator of Sculpture and Decorative Arts, Courtauld Institute of Art, UK) observes in her introduction, "determine our physical and spatial relationship to sculpture and mediate both our aesthetic and intellectual appreciation of it through elements such as inscriptions," yet they have remained relatively neglected as an object of study.
While not at all as accommodating as separate pedestals and rear bags in terms of adjustments and the ease and speed of making adjustments, unitized rests are easy to haul around, quick to set up, stable, relatively inexpensive, and in the case of the Lead Sled, serve a function that other rests do not.