peck


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Related to peck: bushel and a peck

henpeck (someone)

Of a woman, to thoroughly and continually dominate, intimidate, bully, or browbeat (a man), especially her boyfriend, partner, or husband. Janet is usually so nice, but when she's around her husband, she just henpecks him relentlessly.
See also: henpeck

henpecked

Of a man, thoroughly and continually dominated, intimidated, bullied, or browbeaten by a woman, especially his wife or girlfriend. John used to be the most adventurous, spontaneous guy I knew, but since he got married, he's become totally henpecked. I hope I never become some henpecked husband like my father was.
See also: henpeck

pecking order

The hierarchy within a group or organization. There's definitely a pecking order in this company, and you're not going to do well if you don't know your place.
See also: order, peck

bushel and a peck (and some in a gourd)

A lot. This phrase is typically used to emphasize how much one loves someone else. My darling wife, I love you a bushel and a peck.
See also: and, bushel, peck

peck at

To eat something at a slow, unenthusiastic pace in very small bites. I wonder if Mary isn't feeling well—she only pecked at her dinner. He sat moodily at the table, pecking at the plate of vegetables his parent put in front of him.
See also: peck

peck (something) out

1. Literally, to remove something by forcibly and violently pecking at it. We were horrified to see that the birds had pecked his eyes out by the time we arrived.
2. To type something on a typewriter or keyboard by slowly and carefully finding and hitting individual keys. This is why I write everything by hand—it took me nearly half an hour to peck out a formal response on this damned computer! I sat staring off into space before I pecked three words out: "This is rubbish."
See also: out, peck

Peck's bad boy

Someone who engages in dangerous, mischievous, or lewd behavior. An allusion to a fictional character created by George Wilbur Peck in 1883. His reputation as Peck's bad boy was well known throughout the company, but the fact that he made us so much money made him untouchable for nearly 40 years. It baffles me that we still romanticize this image of Peck's bad boy—someone sticking their middle finger up at common decency—as if it's something we should admire.
See also: bad, boy

peck up

Of a bird, to peck something in order to eat it. A noun or pronoun can be used between "peck" and "up." I love scattering seeds on our back porch and watching all sorts of different birds come by to peck them up. A little finch hopped over and began pecking up the crumbs from our sandwiches.
See also: peck, up

pec

Short for "pectoral muscle," one of the two large, flat muscles that go across one's chest. Typically used in the plural. Wow, my pecs are really sore after that workout!

bushel and a peck (and some in a gourd)

Rur. a great deal or amount. (Usually used to answer the question, "How much do you love me?") Mary: How much do you love me? Tom: A bushel and a peck and some in a gourd. We knew that Grandpa loved us a bushel and a peck.
See also: and, bushel, peck

If that don't beat a pig a-pecking!

Rur. That's amazing! Tom: A Republican won the Senate seat! Jane: If that don't beat a pig a-pecking! Mary: Jim lost twenty pounds in one month. Charlie: If that don't beat a pig a-pecking!
See also: beat, if, pig, that

peck at something

 
1. Lit. [for a bird] to poke someone or something with its beak. The bird pecked at the ground, snatching up the ants. I tried to hold on to the bird but it pecked at me hard.
2. Fig. [for someone] to eat just a little bit of something, being as picky as a bird. Are you well, Betty? You are just pecking at your food. Please don't peck at your food. You should eat everything.
See also: peck

peck something up

[for a bird] to eat something up by pecking at it. The chickens pecked all the grain up. The birds pecked up the grain.
See also: peck, up

You have to eat a peck of dirt before you die.

Prov. No one can escape eating a certain amount of dirt on his or her food.; Everyone must endure a number of unpleasant things in his or her lifetime. (Often said to console someone who has eaten some dirt or had to endure something unpleasant.) Ellen: Oh, no! I forgot to wash this apple before I took a bite out of it. Fred: You have to eat a peck of dirt before you die.
See also: before, die, dirt, eat, have, of, peck

pecking order

The hierarchy of authority in a group, as in On a space mission, the astronauts have a definite pecking order. This expression, invented in the 1920s by biologists who discovered that domestic poultry maintain such a hierarchy with one bird pecking another of lower status, was transferred to human behavior in the 1950s.
See also: order, peck

the pecking order

COMMON The pecking order in a group is the order of importance of the people or things within that group. Offices came in 29 sizes, according to your place in the company's pecking order. The British Medical Association issued a warning that doctors may be forced to draw up a pecking order of operations. Note: When groups of hens are kept together, a `pecking order' tends to form. This means that a stronger bird can peck a weaker bird without being pecked in return.
See also: order, peck

pecking order

a hierarchy of status observed among a group of people or animals.
The expression originally referred literally to chickens and other birds, the more dominant of which in a group get to feed before the others.
See also: order, peck

a/the ˈpecking order

(informal, often humorous) the way a group is organized, with some members being more important or powerful than others: You don’t get a company car unless you’re pretty high up in the pecking order.This expression was first used by a scientist in the 1920s after studying groups of birds; he noticed there was an order when birds were feeding, with the strongest birds eating first.
See also: order, peck

peck at

v.
To eat something unenthusiastically by taking small bites: The sullen child only pecked at his carrots.
See also: peck

peck out

v.
To remove something by pecking: The birds pecked the worms out of the apples. The vultures pecked out the dead rabbit's innards.
See also: out, peck

pecks

and pecs and pects (pɛk(t)s)
n. the pectoral muscles. (From weightlifting and bodybuilding.) Look at the pecks on that guy!
See also: peck

pecking order

The hierarchy of authority in a group. The term was invented by biologists in the 1920s to characterize the behavior of hens, who established their barnyard authority by one bird pecking another of lower status. It was transferred to human behavior in the mid-1900s. Lawrence Durrell maintained, “There is a pecking order among diplomats as there is among poultry” (Justine, 1957).
See also: order, peck

Peck's bad boy

A mischief maker. “Peck's Bad Boy'' was the nickname of Hennery, a character created by 19th-century newspaperman George Wilbur Peck. Hennery played pranks on friends, neighbors, and especially his alcoholic father. These stories were later compiled into books, and the character of Hennery appeared in a number of early motion pictures. The phrase “Peck's bad boy'' was applied to someone, usually a youngster, whose impish behavior plagued those around him.
See also: bad, boy
References in periodicals archive ?
At the hotel, she learned to be an observer, and she learned "people skills, more than anything," Peck said.
Peck said, 'I've come a long way, but let's be honest, I'm never gonna look like that.
"We exist to share our knowledge and passion for animals and animal agriculture," says Peck. "Some companies have Purpose or Mission Statements, but ours is simply--we live it."
Behind, Peck hears giggles and a smattering of conversation.
As far as playing the piano, Peck started at age six.
[[dagger]] Ramaria murrillii (Coker) Corner [[dagger]] Ramaria obtusissima (Peck) Corner [[double dagger], NR] Ramaria stricta (Pers.) Quel.
Martins asked him to expand one of his works for the company--and the October 2012 premiere of Year of the Rabbit, set to music by Sufjan Stevens, started the rabbit run of Peck's sudden career sprint.
Replacing a scheduled Peter Martins ballet, Peck's Paz de La Jolla premieres at NYCB on January 31, sharing a program with works by George Balanchine and Alexei Ratmansky.
Peck, who is the founder of manufacturing and distribution company NHP Electrical Products, has paid 100,000 dollars for the 15 minute ride.
Peck Slip Station encompasses a full block front in Lower Manhattan and is located between Pearl and Water streets in the historic South Street Seaport district.
CURT FLOOD, Gene Conley, and Danny Ainge had nothing on Baltimore native Peck Lerian, who challenged the reserve clause and earned fame on both the basketball court and the baseball diamond.
The Usual Suspects star will receive the Gregory Peck Excellence in the Art of Film Award at next month's Dingle Film Festival.
Peck and Gladys Jackson Peck, in 1955 she married Dr.
Linda Levy Peck. Consuming Splendor: Society and Culture in Seventeenth-Century England.
Pecking at a red cube : During the first 5 days of life, chicks were allowed 60 min daily to peck at a red plastic cube (l3x3x3 cm).