pay for

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pay for

1. Literally, to pay money for something that incurs a cost. You're going to have to pay for the vase that your son broke. We weren't having to pay for the water we used where we used to live, so we were shocked when our first water bill came in the mail after moving to this country.
2. To cover the expense of someone else. I'd rather that you don't pay for me—I think people on first dates should share the cost of the evening. We don't have the money to pay for every client who comes to us with a sob story.
3. To suffer as a punishment or atonement for some ill deed or wrongdoing. Mark my words—you'll pay for double-crossing us! The children are all paying for the crimes of their father.
See also: pay

pay for something

 
1. Lit. to pay out money for something. Did you pay for the magazine, or shall I? No, I'll pay for it.
2. Fig. to suffer punishment for something. The criminal will pay for his crimes. I don't like what you did to me, and I'm going to see that you pay for it. Max paid for his wicked ways.
See also: pay

pay for

1. Cover the expenses of, defray the cost of, as in I'll pay for your movie ticket, or This truck will pay for itself within a year. [Mid-1300s]
2. Atone for, suffer for, as in He may have looked like a good manager, but his successor will end up paying for his mistakes . [Late 1600s]
See also: pay

pay for

v.
1. To give some amount of money in return for something: I paid $12 for those gloves. Did you pay for our meal yet?
2. To bear a cost or penalty as a result of some action: You will pay for your laziness when you take your exams and do badly.
See also: pay
References in periodicals archive ?
Paying for editorial coverage is always undesirable.
In the long run, I believe this practice of paying for media coverage can severely undermine the legitimacy of PR.
Albert in benefiting from services provided to her must bear the costs involved in paying for those services.
The court stated that it will not add to the injustice by allowing the tenant Albert to receive benefits from the Condominium without ever paying for them.
"I know what my husband did was wrong and he's paying for it, but I don't think that it's right for the state to walk right in and take everything," says Louise Grable, who is sixty-two.
Prisoners will also start paying for doctor visits and will soon face a "utility tax" on TVs, radios, and the other electrical appliances they use in their cells.
That is the nexus of the issue, and one that has led us into a situation where we really aren't paying for performance.
Lawler offers a good, basic overview of major pay design choices--paying for performance, paying for jobs or people (skills), setting base and benefit pay levels, and so on-and illustrates many of the issues involved in making these choices.
If paying for your child's college education is a priority, then start saving right now.
What often happens is that the shelter allowance does not come close to paying for a typical $500 to $600 Bronx apartment, or for paying for a family's other needs.