pay to (do something)

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pay to (do something)

1. To earn or save one money to do something; to be profitable or economical to do something. It pays to have your boiler serviced regularly to avoid having to pay for expensive repairs or replacements. It just wasn't paying to keep a brick-and-mortar storefront running anymore, so we switched to a totally online business model.
2. To be beneficial or advantageous to one to do something. It always pays to have a good attorney on retainer for situations just like this. I've found that it really pays to research a city thoroughly before you travel there. It always saves a lot of time you would have spent wandering around trying to decide what to do or see.
3. To greatly desire to do something. Used after the auxiliary verb "would" to form the subjunctive mood. Honestly, I would pay to see someone punch that jerk in the face. Ugh, I'd pay to have someone just come in here and do my homework for me.
See also: pay

pay to do something

to be beneficial to do something; to be profitable. It doesn't pay to drive downtown when you can take the train. It pays to take an umbrella with you if it's supposed to rain.
See also: pay
References in classic literature ?
No, I don't mean quite that; of course you CAN insult him, I only mean it's difficult; and so, unless you've got a lot of useless time on your hands it doesn't pay to try.
``An six hundred crowns,'' said Isaac, ``the good Prior might well pay to your honoured valours, and never sit less soft in his stall.''
He gave, accordingly, an order sealed with his signet, to a brother of his tribe at York, requiring him to pay to the bearer the sum of a thousand crowns, and to deliver certain merchandises specified in the note.
The company should not pay to broadcast its own information.
Health care executives are well acquainted with incentive pay, since many executive contracts tie pay to performance.
The unions are opposed to "subjective" supervisory evaluations and to tying a teacher's pay to student test scores.
People who support the fees say that schools strapped for cash would have to cut their activities if students didn't pay to play.
For one thing, it is important to acknowledge that many religiously motivated teachers will sacrifice higher pay to work in a private school whose mission comports with their core beliefs.
M makes advance-reimbursement payments in amounts that cause an employee's after-tax pay to be the same as if there were no additional salary reductions and no advance-reimbursement payments.
The employer would not pay to cover them outside that plan.
A dispute arose when Bryant Imports refused to pay to 1100 Associates the additional rent of 3 percent of the tax increase as required by its lease.
It is said to be very cheap, no doubt owing in part to its somewhat self-financing quality: If the insurer screens cases carefully, it will collect more in fees for its lawyer than it will pay to winning opponents.
While these programs helped curb payroll costs, they didn't accomplish the goal of linking employee pay to organizational/individual performance.
It is our hope to have readers be skeptical of headlines that compare CEO pay to minimum wage workers, but at the same time ask whether CEOs were compensated to the extent of the shareholder value they created.
Unless the plan otherwise defines compensation, this requirement permits back pay or severance pay to be counted as compensation for the purpose of computing benefits, even though the actual service was provided in an earlier year.