pay (one's) debt

(redirected from pay their debt)

pay (one's) debt

1. To repay some or all of the money one owes to someone else. A noun or pronoun can be used between "(one's) and "debt" to specify the type of debt one has accrued. I only won about $5,000 in the lottery, but it was enough to pay my credit card debt. I'm gonna be paying my student loan debt for nearly 20 years.
2. To serve the sentence given to one upon conviction of a crime. Often followed by "to society." In the eyes of the law, he has paid his debt to society, so he shouldn't be facing any further punishment for his past crimes. I spent nearly 15 years in prison—I paid my debt!
See also: debt, pay

pay one's debt (to society)

Cliché to serve a sentence for a crime, usually in prison. The judge said that Mr. Simpson had to pay his debt to society. Mr. Brown paid his debt in state prison.
See also: debt, pay
References in classic literature ?
But indulging your children is one thing, and finding money to pay their debts is another.
Such businesses are just able to the interest on debts, but not reduce the debt itself and in the event of a rise in interest rates will be unable to pay their debt at all;.
Properties that failed to pay their debt or enter into a financing agreement during the presale period were sold on July 28 to a trust run by three city government agencies: the Department of Finance, the Office of Management and Budget, and the Law Department.
"You have to assume that if a country comes to us and says they can't pay their debt then something is wrong with the policies that they are following." Kreiss says.
THE number of people unable to pay their debts is rising, but there are also more people seeking help.
Cereno also noted that if the victims failed to pay their debts, the suspects would kidnap them.
Notifications will be sent about 12 more excise warehouse keepers because they have not taken any action to pay their debts.
From now on firms will have to pay their debts within 60 days at the most or 120 days provided they receive a written consent from their creditor.
And 10% believe they would not be able to cope with any increase in interest rates, while 7% reported that they were already struggling to pay their debts as they became due.
Some driving schools even offer their customers the possibility to take driving lessons and to get the driver's license much more cheaply than their competitors, despite the fact that some of them are already unable to pay their debts.
Now that Latin America is awash in commodity cash, some in the region are jumping at the chance to pay their debts and move on.
Debtors frequently are given more time to pay their debts or a discharge of certain ones.
They eventually pay their debts, but never on time; they never quite get caught up because of continued credit purchases.
Currently the fines can be contested by the power distribution companies, but, according to Boev, DKEVR's next step will be to strip them off their licenses, unless they pay their debts to the cash-strapped National Electric Company (NEK).