pay (someone) peanuts

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pay (someone) peanuts

To pay (someone) a very paltry or miniscule amount; to pay the absolute minimum amount necessary. I had a few jobs during college getting paid peanuts, but it was the only work I could find that fit in with my studies. You're never going to be able to hire an effective manager if you're only willing to pay peanuts.
See also: pay, peanut
References in periodicals archive ?
3" I once rode her mother" Ted Walsh 4 If you pay peanuts you get Monkees - Journalist Peter Corrigan when former pop star Davy Jones won a race worth PS3,000 5 Horses are dangerous at both ends and uncomfortable in the middle Des Lynam THE move to switch the Grand National to a later time of 5.
Living in a greedy world IN a letter to Feedback John Appleyard manages to mangle the metaphor relating to peanuts and monkeys which I have always understood to read "if you pay peanuts you get monkeys" not "if you want peanuts you get monkeys.
Don't expect world class service if you pay peanuts for air travel.
As always, pay peanuts, get monkeys, or - in the case of social media - get social media activities that do not match the quality and personality of your hotel.
To quote the old adage, if you pay peanuts, you get monkeys.
Randy Lerner has to take part of the blame as all he wants is to pay peanuts for players.
So we're subsiding employers who pay peanuts and will continue to do so unless the living wage is brought in.
They say if you pay peanuts you get monkeys, but we've got a load of bloodsuckers.
But it's publicity any sane individual or organisation wouldn't even want to pay peanuts for.
They are subsidised up to the hilt by the British taxpayer, they pay virtually no income tax, there is no unemployment, they pay peanuts for heating and electricity, they have a first-class health infrastructure within the islands, all of course paid for as previously stated, by our taxes.
We have all heard the expressions: "You get what you pay for," "If you pay peanuts, you get monkeys," and "Nothing in life is free.
I couldn't be prouder to be an Australian pilot today, however if Jetstar continues to pay peanuts, how long before the cliché starts to apply?
The old clich has it that, if you pay peanuts you get monkeys, and, if a salary of, say, pounds 210,000 a year - as Colin Hilton is paid in Liverpool - is the going rate for a big authority, there is little chance of being able to defy the market trends and pay much less for the same degree of commitment.