pay court to (someone)

pay court to (someone)

To attempt to gain someone's favor, affection, attention, or interest, especially through flattery or solicitous overtures. They have so much money that they can have an army of lobbyists paying court to politicians in order to maintain their agenda. It can be very jarring and even distressing when young men begin paying court to your daughters when they grow up, but it's something you have to learn to accept.
See also: court, pay, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

pay court to someone

Fig. to solicit someone's attention; to woo someone. The lawyer was thought to be paying court to too many politicians. The lobbyist paid court to all the influential members of Congress.
See also: court, pay, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pay court to

Solicit the favors or affection of, as in If you want to win the daughter, you'll have to pay court to her mother. [Late 1500s]
See also: court, pay, to
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pay court to someone

If you pay court to someone, you try to win their affection or approval. He loved the idea of giving interviews and people paying court to him. He pays court to me, buys me flowers and takes me to dinner.
See also: court, pay, someone, to
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

pay court to

1. To flatter with solicitous overtures in an attempt to obtain something or clear away antagonism.
2. To seek someone's love; woo.
See also: court, pay, to
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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