pay (someone or something) a visit

pay (someone or something) a visit

To visit someone or something. We need to pay Grandma a visit and see how her trip to Florida was.
See also: pay, visit

pay (someone or something) a visit

 and pay a visit to someone or something
to visit someone or something. Bill paid a visit to his aunt in Seattle. Please pay a visit to our house whenever you are in town.
See also: pay, visit
References in classic literature ?
As, on the one hand, the form of the provision would not fulfil the intent of its proposers, so, on the other, if I apprehend that intent rightly, it would be in itself inexpedient.
People in general thought him a lunatic, and blamed his Reform Club friends for having accepted a wager which betrayed the mental aberration of its proposer.
Wouldn't it have as good an effect if the proposer or seconder did that?