pay(s) your money and take(s) your choice, you

pay your money and take your choice

Also, you pays your money and takes your choice. Since you're paying, it's your decision, as in We can take the train or the bus-you pays your money and takes your choice. This term first appeared in the English humor magazine Punch in the mid-1800s and has been repeated ever since.
See also: and, choice, money, pay, take
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pay(s) your money and take(s) your choice, you

It’s your decision as long as you’re willing to pay the price. This term has been traced to the mid-nineteenth century, when it first appeared in print in the English humor magazine Punch. It also appeared in a late nineteenth-century peep-show rhyme cited in the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations: “Whichever you please, my little dears: You pays your money and you takes your choice, You pays your money and what you sees Is a cow or a donkey just as you pleases.”
See also: and, money
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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