pave the way (for someone or something)

pave the way (for someone or something)

To create a situation in which it is easier for someone to do something or something to happen. Everyone knows your father paved the way for you to get into this school with his money and connections. The new legislation paves the way for banks to repossess people's homes no matter what the circumstance. With their star quarterback paving the way, they look to be on their way to another Super Bowl appearance.
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pave the way (for someone or something) (with something)

Fig. to prepare the way with something for someone to come or something to happen. (Alludes to paving a road.) I will pave the way for her with an introduction. I am sure I can pave the way for your success. I will pave the way with an introduction.
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pave the way

Make progress or development easier, as in Her findings paved the way for developing a new vaccine. This expression alludes to paving a road so it is easier to travel on. [Late 1500s]
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pave the way

COMMON If one thing paves the way for another, the first thing makes it easier for the second to happen. A peace agreement last year paved the way for this week's elections. The deal is likely to pave the way for further corporate sponsorship of the event.
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pave the way for

create the circumstances to enable something to happen or be done.
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ˌpave the ˈway (for somebody/something)

make the arrival of somebody/something easier; prepare for somebody/something: Babbage’s early work on calculating machines in the nineteenth century paved the way for the development of computers.
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pave the way

To make progress or development easier: experiments that paved the way for future research.
See also: pave, way