pasture


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greener pastures

A place or thing that is an improvement on one's current situation. I liked my job here, but it just didn't pay enough, so I had to go to greener pastures.
See also: greener, pasture

new pastures

A new job or place to live that offers new experiences or opportunities. Starting next month, I'll be packing up my job with the newspaper and heading off to new pastures. I've loved living in New York City, but it's time to find new pastures.
See also: new, pasture

pastures new

A new job or place to live that offers new experiences or opportunities. Primarily heard in UK. Starting next month, I'll be packing up my job with the newspaper and heading off to pastures new. I've loved living in London, but it's time to find pastures new.
See also: new, pasture

put (someone or something) out to pasture

1. To force, coerce, or pressure someone into retiring from their work. The CEO shaped the company into what it is today, but she's getting on in years and the board of directors has decided to put her out to pasture.
2. To retire a piece of equipment from use or replace it with something newer. I got through my entire graduate degree on this clunky old laptop, but I think it's finally time to put it out to pasture.
See also: out, pasture, put

put a horse out to pasture

to retire a horse by allowing it to live out its days in a pasture with no work. (See also put someone out to pasture.) The horse could no longer work, so we put it out to pasture.
See also: horse, out, pasture, put

put someone out to pasture

Fig. to retire someone. (Based on put a horse out to pasture.) Please don't put me out to pasture. I have lots of good years left. This vice president has reached retirement age. It's time to put him out to pasture.
See also: out, pasture, put

put out to grass

Also, put out to pasture. Cause to retire, as in With mandatory retirement they put you out to grass at age 65, or She's not all that busy now that she's been put out to pasture. These idioms refer to farm animals sent to graze when they are no longer useful for other work.
See also: grass, out, put

put someone out to pasture

If you put someone out to pasture, you make them retire from their job, or move them to an unimportant job, usually because you think that they are too old to be useful. I'm retiring next month. They're putting me out to pasture. He should not yet be put out to pasture. His ministerial experience is valuable. Compare with be put out to grass. Note: When horses have reached the end of their working lives, they are sometimes released into fields (= pasture) to graze.
See also: out, pasture, put, someone

greener pastures

People talk about greener pastures to mean a better life or situation than the one they are in now. A lot of nurses seek greener pastures overseas. They moved around for years, sometimes even leaving the state for what they thought would be greener pastures.
See also: greener, pasture

pastures new

BRITISH
COMMON If someone moves on to pastures new, they leave their present place or situation and move to a new one. Michael decided he wanted to move on to pastures new for financial reasons. I found myself packing a suitcase and heading for pastures new. Note: You can also talk about moving on to new pastures or fresh pastures. No matter how much we long for new pastures, when we reach them they can seem like a bad idea. Note: This is a quotation from `Lycidas' (1638) by the English poet Milton: `At last he rose, and twitch'd his Mantle blew: Tomorrow to fresh Woods, and Pastures new.' This is sometimes wrongly quoted as `fresh fields and pastures new'.
See also: new, pasture

(fresh fields and) pastures new

a place or activity regarded as offering new opportunities.
The expression is a slightly garbled version of a line from Milton's poem Lycidas ( 1637 ): ‘Tomorrow to fresh woods and pastures new’.
See also: new, pasture

put someone out to pasture

force someone to retire.
See also: out, pasture, put, someone

put somebody out to ˈpasture

(informal, humorous) ask somebody to leave a job because they are getting old; make somebody retire: Isn’t it time some of these politicians were put out to pasture?This expression refers to old farm horses or other animals, which no longer work and stay in the fields (= pastures) all day.
See also: out, pasture, put, somebody

ˌpastures ˈnew

a new job, place to live, way of life, etc: After 10 years as a teacher, Jen felt it was time to move on to pastures new.Without warning, she left him for pastures new.
See also: new, pasture

put out to pasture

1. To herd (grazing animals) into pasturable land.
2. Informal To retire or compel to retire from work or a full workload.
See also: out, pasture, put
References in periodicals archive ?
The Moroyan Pon pasture is saq area belonging to another group of households of the village.
remaining 400,000 ha of pastures are overpastured, which is pregnant with desertification.
Overgrazing this type of pasture will damage the plants and eventually kill them.
We used a standard least-squares ANOVA to test the effect of year (2001, 2002, 2003), elevation (low, middle, high), sampling period (immediately before cattle entered a pasture, immediately after cattle left a pasture, and at the end of the growing season), and interactions.
It also tells me places to avoid, especially where there is insufficient pasture and places where our animals are likely to contract diseases," she explains.
127 million soms were collected for the use of pastures in 2017 or 6 million som higher than the previous year, the press service of the Ministry of Agriculture, Food Industry and Land Reclamation said.
Australian Chief Plant Protection Officer, Dr Kim Ritman, is visiting the Australian Pastures Genebank in South Australia today, to oversee the preservation of Australias pastures and cropping legacy as local seeds are prepared for transfer to the Svalbard Global Seed Vault in Norway.
In a number of studies from that era, hens raised on a mix of nutritionally balanced pasture and grain products were able to produce as many as 180 eggs per year.
And my selection's BHA rating of 109 should prove within range Perfect Pasture went close off a 2lb lower rating when last seen in handicap company at Nottingham last back-end.
Light intensity, temperature, day length and water supply, as well as other soil factors, have all been identified as determinants of pasture growth rate and thus potential N fertiliser response (Frame 1992; Whitehead 1995; Sun et al.
Pasture for Life - It Can Be Done, which provides compelling case studies supporting the approach, was unveiled at this week's Oxford Real Farming Conference.
He said in his statement Tuesday before the Parliament on the situation of the pasture and natural fodder, that the core solution for the feed gap was to provide about 15 million Kenana feed sacks for distribution to the livestock breeders in all the country, cultivation of an area of one million acres of green fodder in all agricultural projects in the states and optimum exploitation of agricultural residuals and to be manufactured in order to achieve abundance of forage.
Instead it is part of a woodland pasture, a group of open-grown trees shading grass and livestock.