pass water

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pass water

euphemism To urinate. It's a fairly common malady for men to start having trouble passing water when they reach a certain age.
See also: pass, water
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

pass water

urinate. dated euphemistic
See also: pass, water
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

pass ˈwater

(formal) pass urine (= waste liquid) out of your body; urinate
See also: pass, water
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
Because the temperature at which most HCAs form is too low to transform them into a gas, he explains, scientists have assumed that HCAs would "volatilize" by hitching a ride on passing water or fat molecules.
Some of the games were Lime and Spoon race, Passing the Hat, Breaking the Pot and Passing Water Balloon.
"BPH is associated with a number of common symptoms, including a need to pass water more frequently and urgently, often at night, with occasional leaking or dribbling, hesitancy in passing water, or a weak stream of straining, and a feeling that the bladder is never fully empty."
1 Blood in the urine, pain on passing water, especially at the end of the flow.
He jumped in, hauled Umar to safety and alerted a passing water taxi whose crew plucked Mohammed from the river.
He started resuscitating him in the water, before getting the attention of a passing water taxi, whose crew helped pull both boys on board before an ambulance arrived.
Prostate problems can make the gland enlarge or inflamed and this can lead to difficulties passing water.
These can easily be done when passing water. Simply try to stop and start the flow using your pelvic muscles.
Is it painful for them to pass water or are they passing water much more often than usual?
Engineers evaluating high-level-waste barrier systems have assumed that any plutonium or americium leached from vitrified waste would dissolve into passing water, Bastes says.