pass the time of day


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pass the time of day

To chat, gossip, or exchange pleasantries (with someone). I love walking down to the local shop and passing the time of day with everyone in the neighborhood along the way.
See also: of, pass, time

pass the time of day (with someone)

to chat or talk informally with someone. I saw Mr. Brown in town yesterday. I stopped and passed the time of day with him. No, we didn't have a serious talk; we just passed the time of day.
See also: of, pass, time

pass the time of day

exchange a greeting or casual remarks.
See also: of, pass, time

pass the time of ˈday (with somebody)

greet somebody and have a short conversation with them about things that are not very important: I don’t know any of the neighbours very well, only just enough to pass the the time of day.
See also: of, pass, time

pass the time of day

To exchange greetings or engage in pleasantries.
See also: of, pass, time

pass the time of day, to

To exchange greetings, pleasantries, or chat; engage in small talk. The redoubtable Ebenezer Brewer thought this turn of phrase came from the practice of greeting someone with a remark appropriate to the time of day, such as “Good afternoon.” Whether or not this is true, the term dates from the first half of the nineteenth century and remains current.
See also: of, pass, time
References in periodicals archive ?
That's true - what some nutters do to pass the time of day interests me, I wouldn't copy them, though, obviously.
Someone can catch your eye, make you smile, or even pass the time of day, and you can feel fortified from this today.
One local said: "He'd always go out of his way to say hello and have a little chat, to pass the time of day. You couldn't find a bad word about the guy, he was the landlord's landlord if you know what I mean.
Combining this with a coffee kiosk with tables and chairs around would be welcome - like the Piazza Navona or Pantheon Square in Rome, where people sit and read papers and drink coffee, take in the architecture and pass the time of day in conversation.
AS I stopped to pass the time of day with a well-known cabinet minister, he virtually shouted "I'm not campaigning".
"But by the time they go out, they are hardly holding hands, but they can pass the time of day."
Right, a girl of 13 is drunk by lunchtime in Perth; DOING THE ROUNDS: Kids getting blazing drunk on the streets is a common sight in rural communities as well as in the big cities; OBLIVION: Two boys pass the time of day by getting out of their heads on a fortified fruit drink and alcoholic lemonade
"We say good morning and pass the time of day, and Guy tells me he can get a very good view of her from our bedroom window!"
We all know that hurricanes hardly ever happen in Hertfordshire, Herefordshire and Hampshire, but it doesn't take an Eliza Dolittle (no relation to the doctor) to pass the time of day in this magnificent borough.
What began as an 'interest' to pass the time of day, during the enforced rest of her first pregnancy, became a passionate and fulfilling outlet for Vivienne's creative energies.
"We'd have a chat down the pub and pass the time of day, we really quite liked them," Mrs Mann said.
We would often pass the time of day in Newcastle's Bigg Market where he ran the Rupali Restaurant (later to become Curry Capital).
He'd pass the time of day by walking to the town centre and back"
Angus Stevenson, project manager with OUP, said much of the frequency with which words such as "time" and "man" feature could be put down to the English love of phrases like "I would not even pass the time of day with him", and "time waits for no man".
Service is quick, but no one stopped to pass the time of day on our visit and we can't remember seeing a smile.