pass muster, to

pass muster

To be accepted as adequate; to meet the minimum or standard requirement. I gave the interview my best, but I guess I didn't pass muster. There are so many typos and structural problems—there's no way this report will pass muster with the boss.
See also: muster, pass

pass muster

Fig. to measure up to the required standards. I tried, but my efforts didn't pass muster. If you don't wear a jacket and tie, you won't pass muster at that fancy restaurant. They won't let you in.
See also: muster, pass

pass muster

Meet a required standard, as in That yard cleanup won't pass muster with Mom. This expression originally meant "to undergo a military review without censure," muster referring to an assembling of troops for inspection or a similar purpose. [Late 1500s]
See also: muster, pass

pass muster

FORMAL
COMMON If someone or something passes muster, they are of a satisfactory standard for a particular purpose or job. He spoke French and Spanish and could just about pass muster in Italian. It is the only country that has yet to fulfill all the membership requirements, but it is expected to pass muster soon. Note: In the army and navy, a `muster' is an inspection of the soldiers' or sailors' uniforms and equipment.
See also: muster, pass

pass muster

be accepted as adequate or satisfactory.
This was originally a military expression, meaning ‘come through a review or inspection without censure’. It is found earlier (late 16th century to late 17th century) in the now obsolete form pass (the ) musters and has been in figurative use since the late 16th century.
See also: muster, pass

pass ˈmuster

be good enough; be acceptable: I didn’t think Charlie’s parents would like me, but evidently I pass muster. Muster is the calling together of soldiers, sailors, etc. for inspection. If you pass muster, you pass the inspection without criticism.
See also: muster, pass

pass muster

To be judged as acceptable.
See also: muster, pass

pass muster

To pass an examination or inspection; measure up to a given standard.
See also: muster, pass

pass muster, to

To meet a required standard. This term originated in the military and once meant to undergo review without censure. George Gascoigne used it figuratively in 1575: “The latter verse is neither true nor pleasant, and the first verse may pass the musters” (The Making of Verse). It was a cliché by the time Jonathan Swift included it in Polite Conversation (1738), and it remains current.
See also: pass
References in periodicals archive ?
In instances where projects reviewed barely pass muster, to your credit you have always managed some positive comments.