pass muster


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pass muster

To be accepted as adequate; to meet the minimum or standard requirement. I gave the interview my best, but I guess I didn't pass muster. There are so many typos and structural problems—there's no way this report will pass muster with the boss.
See also: muster, pass

pass muster

Fig. to measure up to the required standards. I tried, but my efforts didn't pass muster. If you don't wear a jacket and tie, you won't pass muster at that fancy restaurant. They won't let you in.
See also: muster, pass

pass muster

Meet a required standard, as in That yard cleanup won't pass muster with Mom. This expression originally meant "to undergo a military review without censure," muster referring to an assembling of troops for inspection or a similar purpose. [Late 1500s]
See also: muster, pass

pass muster

FORMAL
COMMON If someone or something passes muster, they are of a satisfactory standard for a particular purpose or job. He spoke French and Spanish and could just about pass muster in Italian. It is the only country that has yet to fulfill all the membership requirements, but it is expected to pass muster soon. Note: In the army and navy, a `muster' is an inspection of the soldiers' or sailors' uniforms and equipment.
See also: muster, pass

pass muster

be accepted as adequate or satisfactory.
This was originally a military expression, meaning ‘come through a review or inspection without censure’. It is found earlier (late 16th century to late 17th century) in the now obsolete form pass (the ) musters and has been in figurative use since the late 16th century.
See also: muster, pass

pass ˈmuster

be good enough; be acceptable: I didn’t think Charlie’s parents would like me, but evidently I pass muster. Muster is the calling together of soldiers, sailors, etc. for inspection. If you pass muster, you pass the inspection without criticism.
See also: muster, pass

pass muster

To be judged as acceptable.
See also: muster, pass

pass muster

To pass an examination or inspection; measure up to a given standard.
See also: muster, pass
References in periodicals archive ?
Microsoft: Software giant Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT) is the big news story on Friday, as the company's earnings report, issued Thursday evening, failed to pass muster on the Street.
PASS MUSTER n Australian firefighters take part in race
To insist you have no knowledge of a dodgy donation when you wrote to the donor to thank him for it wouldn't pass muster in a primary school.
In a country that is officially secular and where separation of church and state is the law of the land, demands to alter the Constitution based on the interpretation of holy books or church doctrine simply do not pass muster.
It then created an approval process so byzantine that it took companies years and hundreds of millions of dollars to pass muster just for the license, before they had spent the first dollar on construction.
Since these securitized mortgages would qualify for a defeasance only recently, as certain owners decided they'd like to refinance, attorneys wanted to make sure the clause would pass muster with the state taxing authorities.
If these treatments had to meet the same standards applied to new drugs by the Food and Drug Administration, the procedures probably wouldn't pass muster, he asserts.
Companies awarded this honor had to pass muster with some of Silicon Valley's top industry veterans, corporate executives, and successful entrepreneurs.
Shock-absorbing Supalite soles grip well and the boots are stylish enough to pass muster in a country pub.
To suggest that because we have relations in England we must all be run from a government in London wouldn't pass muster in a primary school debating society.
And that, apparently, is all it takes for wacky educational policy to pass muster in the Assembly.
When the Clintons' "health alliances" select the few plans in each geographical area they will offer to subscribers, these firms are confident they will pass muster.
That measure, its sponsors hope, could be introduced in the Senate, as well, as it is considered more likely to pass muster through the Assembly and the Governor.
Childs' argument did not pass muster with "well-established" New York law, which subjects indemnification agreements to "heightened" scrutiny.
Re ``Passing the buck won't pass muster on hospital'' (Their Opinions, Feb.