pass for


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pass for (someone or something)

1. To be able to be accepted as or believed to be someone or something else. The fact that glass can so easily pass for diamond among most consumers tells me that the gem's value is kind of a hoax. With the right clothes and makeup, I think you could easily pass for an adult.
2. To cause someone or something be accepted as or believed to be someone or something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pass" and "for." A fancy glass exterior isn't enough to pass this budget phone for the premium gadget the company wants you to think that it is. A nice suit could easily pass you for a respectable businessman.
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Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

pass for someone or something

to be accepted as someone, some type of person, or something. You could pass for your twin brother. This painting could almost pass for the original.
See also: pass

pass for something

to pay for something; to treat someone by paying for something. Come on. Let's go out. I'll pass for dinner. I'll pass for drinks if you want.
See also: pass
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pass for

Be accepted as or believed to be, usually something that is not so. For example, Jean is 23 but could pass for a teenager, or They thought that copy would pass for an original. [Late 1500s]
See also: pass
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pass for

v.
To be accepted as something; be believed to be something: The fake painting passed for an original. If you wore that heavy coat and fur hat, you could pass for a Russian.
See also: pass
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In her fourth novel, Morrison again returns to the theme of passing without supplying a single character who is capable of or willing to pass for white.
Nevertheless, the idea of passing for white is invoked, and it is, moreover, the mystery of whether or not Sing did pass for white that finally doubles her significance.
Delia Best, in contrast to Sing, is clearly delineated as capable of passing and somewhat willing to pass for white.
Before deciding to pass for white, Clare lived an African American identity, not as Irene does as a member of the black middle class, but first as an impoverished daughter of an alcoholic janitor and then as the orphaned niece of two white great-aunts who treat Clare as if they were ugly step-sisters in the Cinderella tale.
You can use a bigger player (to look over the defense) or a good shooter in the inbounder spot - a player who can step in and receive a return pass for a shot.