passe

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pass a bum check

To submit a money order as payment when the account being drawn upon does not or will not have adequate funds for the order to clear. Primarily heard in US. My ex-husband was so addicted to shopping that, by the end of our marriage, he had started passing bum checks just to keep making purchases. Being in debt has always scared the hell out of me, so I've made sure to never pass a bum check in my life.
See also: bum, check, pass

pass (something) with flying colours

To win, achieve, or accomplish something exceptionally well or very successfully. Said especially of a test, examination, or training of some kind. Primarily heard in UK. Samantha was rather nervous taking her final exam, but she passed with flying colours! Your brother passed his apprenticeship with flying colours. He'll be a master builder in no time!
See also: colour, flying, pass

pass the Rubicon

To commit to a particular plan or course of action. The phrase refers to how Julius Caesar crossed the Rubicon river and became embroiled in civil war in 49 BCE. Look, if you cheat on this test, you are passing the Rubicon, man. You can't take that back. I think I passed the Rubicon when I took this management position. It would be a huge pay cut to go back to my old job, and my boss would be furious.
See also: pass, Rubicon

pass on to the Great Beyond

euphemism To die. It's such a shame that Tom has passed on to the Great Beyond. When is his funeral?
See also: beyond, great, on, pass

pass under the yoke

To be humiliated in defeat. The phrase derives from the ancient practice of humiliating troops by having them walk under a yoke that was symbolic of the victorious army. Many enemy soldiers passed under the yoke of the Roman army. Having to attend my rival's medal ceremony is like passing under the yoke.
See also: pass, yoke

pass (something) with flying colors

To win, achieve, or accomplish something exceptionally well or very successfully. Said especially of a test, examination, or training of some kind. Samantha was rather nervous taking her final exam, but she passed with flying colors! Your brother passed his apprenticeship with flying colors. He'll be a master builder in no time!
See also: color, flying, pass

pass along

1. To deliver something to an intended recipient after having received it from someone else. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pass" and "along." Can you pass this notebook along to Jim when you see him in Spanish class? Grandpa gave me a few of his old magazines to pass along to you.
2. To relay a message from one person to another. Sure, I'll pass that info along to the Jamie. Please pass along my message when you see him.
See also: pass

have passed (someone or something's) sell-by date

1. Literally, to be past the date by which an edible item should be sold before it spoils. That milk has definitely past its sell-by date—it's curdled!
2. By extension, to be past the peak of one's abilities or career. The company is forcing my mother to retire because they think she has past her sell-by date. That player has definitely past his sell-by date—he hasn't had a good season in years.
See also: date, have, passe

pass current

1. obsolete Of a coin, to have a particular monetary worth. The coin passed current for 21 shillings until the end of the 17th century.
2. near-obsolete To be considered genuine or authentic. What passes current as orthodox religious views these days would be considered quite liberal—downright blasphemous, even—two hundred years ago.
See also: current, pass

pass water

euphemism, old-fashioned To urinate. It's a fairly common malady for men to start having trouble passing water when they reach a certain age.
See also: pass, water

pass something along

 (to someone)
1. to give or hand something to someone. Would you kindly pass this along to Hillary? Please pass along my advice to Wally over there.
2. to relay some information to someone. I hope you don't pass this along to anyone, but I am taking a new job next month. Could you pass along my message to Fred?
See also: pass

have passed your sell-by date

BRITISH
COMMON If someone or something has passed their sell-by date, they are no longer useful, successful, or relevant. Do you think our marriage has passed its sell-by date? Note: You can also say that someone or something is past their sell-by date. Many people feel the presenter is past her sell-by date. Note: You can also say that someone or something has reached their sell-by date. Critics of the monarchy say it has reached its sell-by date. Note: Most food has a date stamped on its packaging: this is its sell-by date. After this date it is no longer fresh enough to sell.
See also: date, have, passe

pass current

be generally accepted as true or genuine. British
Pass current originally referred to the currency of a genuine coin, as opposed to a counterfeit one.
See also: current, pass

pass water

urinate. dated euphemistic
See also: pass, water

pass ˈwater

(formal) pass urine (= waste liquid) out of your body; urinate
See also: pass, water