parting of the ways, a

parting of the ways

A point at which people or entities separate, depart from, or stop associating with one another. The disagreement has led to a parting of the ways between the two global superpowers. I told her I wasn't willing to have children, so we came to a parting of the ways.
See also: of, parting, way

parting of the ways

a point at which people separate and go their own ways. (Often with come to a, arrive at a, reach a, etc.) Jane and Bob finally came to a parting of the ways. Bill and his parents reached a parting of the ways.
See also: of, parting, way

parting of the ways

A point of divergence, especially an important one, as in When Jim decided to travel with the band and Jill wanted a more normal home life, they came to a parting of the ways . This term, which transfers a fork in a road to alternative courses of action, appears in the Bible (Ezekiel 21:21), where the king of Babylon must decide whether or not to attack Jerusalem: "[He] stood at the parting of the way." [c. 1600]
See also: of, parting, way

a (or the) parting of the ways

a point at which two people must separate or at which a decision must be taken.
This phrase has its origins in Ezekiel 21:21: ‘the king of Babylon stood at the parting of the way, at the head of the two ways’.
See also: of, parting, way

parting of the ways

A point of divergence, especially one of great moment.
See also: of, parting, way

parting of the ways, a

A point of decision between two alternatives. This term stems from the Bible (Ezekiel 21:21): “For the king of Babylon stood at the parting of the way, at the head of the two ways,” when he had to decide whether or not to attack Jerusalem. It continues to be so used. Moreover, when applied to two or more persons or groups, it implies that they will choose different paths or courses of action.
See also: of, parting