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party

1. noun, dated slang A person regarded for a particular quality, especially of being strange. The health inspector came by today. He's a bit of an odd party, isn't he?
2. verb, slang To take drugs for recreational purposes. He pulled out a joint and asked me if I wanted to party.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

party

1. n. a combining form used in expressions to refer to certain kinds of activity carried on in groups or in pairs. (For examples, see coke party, grass party, hen party, keg party, kick party, pot party, stag-party, tailgate party, tea party.)
2. in. to drink alcohol, smoke marijuana, or use other drugs. (May also include sexual activity.) Come on, man! Let’s party!
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Prohibit ex parte contacts between the arbitrator and the parties.
Insurance companies should be aware that, whether they are responding to subpoenas as nonparties or issuing subpoenas on their own behalf, in the area where nonparties are most likely to incur significant costs--attorney's fees resulting from reviewing documents for responsiveness and privilege--there are arguments to be made that these costs should shift from producing parties to requesting parties.
However, it's highly probable that the accountant already represents both parties in his work.
A document restriction policy allows the company to have only those persons who understand patent law review, analyze, and discuss patents of third parties. In addition, those persons can be trained to limit commentary and to contact the legal department, if necessary.
"I've been to at least 16 different parties in the past year," says Evans, the Positive Health Project staffer who accompanied me to the sex party in Brooklyn.
It should be considered also that in New York City in this period, despite the absence of segregation laws, even though there was racial discrimination in ordinary life as well as in the political activities of the two major parties, the Democratic Party between 1930 and WWII underwent a significant transformation in its attitude toward race.
Such policies should explain the FCPA (and any relevant local law) and set forth procedures governing common FCPA risk areas, such as gifts and entertainment, facilitating payments, and retention of third parties.
The impact of this decision is that private parties who voluntarily clean up a contaminated site without first having been subject to such an order or suit cannot seek contribution for their response costs from other PRPs under CERCLA unless they can persuade the State or Federal government to bring an enforcement action against them.
* A binding agreement by the attorneys and parties to avoid litigation.
Some of America's Founders viewed political parties as a serious threat.
Since the law was not suspended during the court proceedings, candidates, parties and political groups have operated under the new rules for more than a year, and the initial impact of the law is becoming clear.
In response to member inquiries regarding outsourcing engagements to third parties, AICPA General Counsel Richard I.
Bourne had stated that the party was a "bulwark of Christianity." Analyzing the political groups, Bourne said that the Conservatives were intimately linked with the Church of England, the Liberals had tried to permanently damage Christian education, and, while there were Marxist elements in the Labour Party, the faithful could defend the Catholic principles in it, as they had in the two old-line parties. He did not believe that Quadragesimo Anno was applicable to the Labourites as it was to the Marxist labour parties on the European continent.
Sometimes residents or their responsible parties become seriously past due, either by an honest mistake or through willful disregard.