pardon


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I beg your pardon

1. I apologize for what I just did or said. Oh, I beg your pardon. I wasn't looking where I was going.
2. What did you just say? Could you please repeat that? I beg your pardon, I couldn't quite hear you.
3. An expression or exclamation of indignation or incredulous disbelief. A: "I'm afraid we're going to have to cut your funding, effective immediately." B: "I beg your pardon? Who on earth decided that?"
4. Could you please give me your attention. I beg your pardon, everyone, but I'd like to get tonight's proceedings underway.
5. I believe you are mistaken or incorrect; I beg to differ; I don't agree with you on that. I beg your pardon, but I believe you'll find that our school is actually one of the best in the state.
See also: beg, pardon

beg to differ

To politely disagree with someone else. I'm sorry, headmaster, but I beg to differ. Students at this school should have more access to financial aid and scholarships, not less. He thinks that the evening was a disaster, but I beg to differ—I saw plenty of guests enjoying themselves!
See also: beg, differ

excuse me

1. A polite phrase used after one has done something that does not adhere to proper etiquette. Oh, excuse me—I didn't mean to bump into you, ma'am. Petey, say "excuse me" after you burp!
2. A phrase said when one is trying to pass through a crowded area. This phrase is sometimes verbally shortened to 'scuse me. Excuse me, everyone, I have to get through with this cart.
3. An expression of politeness that precedes a possible disagreement or an upsetting question. Excuse me, sir, but didn't you specifically tell us to make that change last month?
4. An indignant response, often posed as a question. Excuse me? How can you say something that hurtful to me, your own mother? Well, excuse me for actually caring about your future, unlike you!
5. A request for one to repeat what they have said. Excuse me? I'm sorry, I couldn't hear you.
6. A phrase used when one is correcting a verbal mistake. We had 200, excuse me, 210 people at the event.
7. An apologetic phrase that precedes an interruption. Excuse me, sir, but your wife is calling on line two—she says it's urgent.
8. An apologetic phrase that precedes a departure. Excuse me, I have to leave early for a doctor's appointment. I'll see you all tomorrow.
See also: excuse

pardon me

1. I apologize for what I just did or said. Oh, pardon me! I wasn't looking where I was going.
2. What did you just say? Could you please repeat that? Pardon me? I couldn't quite hear you.
3. An expression or exclamation of indignation or incredulous disbelief. A: "I'm afraid we're going to have to cut your funding, effective immediately." B: "Pardon me? Who on earth decided that?"
4. Could you please give me your attention. Pardon me, everyone, but I'd like to get tonight's proceedings underway.
5. I believe you are mistaken or incorrect; I beg to differ; I don't agree with you on that. Pardon me, but I believe you'll find that our school is actually one of the best in the state.
See also: pardon

Pardon me for breathing!

An angry, exasperated response to a criticism or rebuke that one feels is unwarranted or unjustified. A: "Would you please just sit down and stop trying to help? You're only getting in my way." B: "Well, pardon me for breathing!"
See also: pardon

pardon my French

Excuse my inappropriate language. Usually used humorously, especially around children, as if to suggest that an inappropriate word was in fact a word from a different language. A: "John, don't use language like that in front of the kids." B: "Oops, pardon my French, everyone!" Pardon my French, but this tasted like shit.
See also: french, pardon

pardon me for living/breathing/existing/etc.

An angry, exasperated response to a criticism or rebuke that one feels is unwarranted or unjustified, especially since they believe they did something very minimal or nothing at all. (Any verb that approximately means "living" can be used after "for.") A: "Would you please just sit down and stop getting in my way?" B: "Well, pardon me for breathing!" You don't need to get so upset, I was just suggesting you ask for directions. Pardon me for living!

Pardon me for existing!

An angry, exasperated response to a criticism or rebuke that one feels is unwarranted or unjustified, especially since they believe they did something very minimal or nothing at all. A: "Would you please just sit down and stop getting in my way?" B: "Well, pardon me for existing!" You don't need to get so upset, I was just suggesting you ask for directions. Pardon me for existing!
See also: pardon

Pardon me for living!

An angry, exasperated response to a criticism or rebuke that one feels is unwarranted or unjustified, especially since they believe they did something very minimal or nothing at all. A: "Would you please just sit down and stop getting in my way?" B: "Well, pardon me for living!" You don't need to get so upset, I was just suggesting you ask for directions. Pardon me for living!
See also: pardon

I beg your pardon, but (something)

I believe you are mistaken or incorrect; I beg to differ; I don't agree with you on that. I beg your pardon, but I believe you'll find that our school is actually one of the best in the state.
See also: beg, but

begging your pardon, but (something)

I believe you are mistaken or incorrect; I beg to differ; I don't agree with you on that. Begging your pardon, but I believe you'll find that our school is actually one of the best in the state.
See also: beg, but

never ask pardon before you are accused

Apologizing for something before someone has laid blame on you for it only ensures that you are thought of as the guilty party. A: "I accidentally scratched his car pulling out of the parking lot last night. Should I offer to pay for it?" B: "Never ask pardon before you're accused. He might not even notice."
See also: accused, ask, before, never, pardon

pardon (one) for (something)

1. To forgive or excuse one for committing some crime, wrong, or faux pas. I know that Mr. Reginald will be willing to pardon you for your theft if you return the stolen goods at once and offer a sincere, heartfelt apology. Can you ever pardon me for behaving so boorishly?
2. To issue a formal pardon that overturns one's conviction and releases one from prison. The governor pardoned several people for their wrongful convictions.
3. An angry, exasperated response to a criticism or rebuke that one feels is unwarranted or unjustified. (Any gerund verb that approximately means "living" can be used after "for.") A: "Would you please just sit down and stop trying to help? You're only getting in my way!" B: "Well, pardon me for breathing!" Pardon me for living—I was just suggesting you ask for directions!
See also: pardon

beg to differ (with someone)

Fig. to disagree with someone; to state one's disagreement with someone in a polite way. (Usually used in a statement made to the person being disagreed with.) I beg to differ with you, but you have stated everything exactly backwards. If I may beg to differ, you have not expressed my position as well as you seem to think.
See also: beg, differ

Excuse me.

 and Excuse, please.; Pardon (me).; 'Scusc (me).; 'Scusc, please. 
1. an expression asking forgiveness for some minor social violation, such as belching or bumping into someone. ('Scuse is colloquial, and the apostrophe is not always used.) John: Ouch! Bob: Excuse me. I didn't see you there. Mary: Oh! Ow! Sue: Pardon me. I didn't mean to bump into you. Tom: Ouch! Mary: Oh, dear! What happened? Tom: You stepped on my toe. Mary: Excuse me. I'm sorry.
2. Please let me through.; Please let me by. Tom: Excuse me. I need to get past. Bob: Oh, sorry. I didn't know I was in the way. Mary: Pardon me. Sue: What? Mary: Pardon me. I want to get past you.
See also: excuse

(I) beg your pardon, but...

 and Begging your pardon, but...
Please excuse me, but. (A very polite and formal way of interrupting, bringing something to someone's attention, or asking a question of a stranger.) Rachel: Beg your pardon, but I think your right front tire is a little low. Henry: Well, I guess it is. Thank you. John: Begging your pardon, ma'am, but weren't we on the same cruise ship in Alaska last July? Rachel: Couldn't have been me.
See also: beg, but

if you'll pardon the expression

Fig. excuse the expression I am about to say or just said. This thing is—if you'll pardon the expression—loused up. I'm really jacked, if you'll pardon the expression.
See also: expression, if, pardon

Never ask pardon before you are accused.

Prov. Do not apologize for something if nobody knows that you did it, because by apologizing, you are admitting that you did it. Alan: Should I apologize to Jane for losing the necktie she gave me? Jane: Wait and see if she asks you what happened to the necktie. Never ask pardon before you are accused.
See also: accused, ask, before, never, pardon

Pardon me for living!

Inf. a very indignant response to a criticism or rebuke. Fred: Oh, I thought you had already taken yourself out of here! Sue: Well, pardon me for living! Tom: Butt out, Mary! Bill and I are talking. Mary: Pardon me for living!
See also: pardon

Pardon my French,

 and Excuse my French.
Inf. Excuse my use of swear words or taboo words. (Does not refer to real French.) Pardon my French, but this is a hell of a day. What she needs is a kick in the ass, if you'll excuse my French.
See also: french, pardon

pardon someone for something

 
1. to excuse someone for doing something. Will you please pardon me for what I did? I can't pardon her for that.
2. to excuse and release a convicted criminal. The governor pardoned Max for his crime. The governor did not pardon any drug dealers for their crimes.
See also: pardon

beg to differ

Disagree with someone, as in John told me Max was sure to win, but I beg to differ-I don't think he has a chance. This courteous formula for expressing disagreement echoes similar uses of beg in the sense of "ask," such as I beg your pardon, so used since about 1600. Also see excuse me.
See also: beg, differ

excuse me

1. Also, I beg your pardon, pardon me. Forgive me, as in Excuse me, please let me pass, or Pardon me for asking, or I beg your pardon, I don't think so. These phrases are used as an apology for interrupting a conversation, bumping into someone, asking a speaker to repeat something, politely disagreeing with something said, and so on. The first dates from about 1600, the first variant from about 1800, the second from the mid-1700s.
2. Also, excuse oneself. Allow or ask to leave or be released from an obligation. For example, Please excuse me, I have to leave now, or I asked the judge to excuse me from jury duty. [1920s]
See also: excuse

I beg your pardon

see under beg to differ.
See also: beg, pardon

pardon my French

INFORMAL
People say pardon my French to apologize in a humorous way for using a rude word. What a bunch of a-holes, pardon my French.
See also: french, pardon

I beg your ˈpardon

(formal)
1 used as a polite way of saying sorry for something you have just said or done: Did I step on your toe? Oh, I beg your pardon!
2 used to ask somebody to repeat what they have just said because you did not hear: ‘It’s on Duke Street.’ ‘I beg your pardon?’ ‘Duke Street.’
3 (especially British English) used to show that you are angry or offended: I beg your pardon! I’d rather you didn’t refer to my father as ‘that fat man’.
See also: beg, pardon

exˈcuse me


1 used before you do or say something that might annoy somebody, or to get somebody’s attention: Excuse me, is anybody sitting here?Excuse me, could you tell me the time, please?
2 used for saying sorry or disagreeing with somebody, or for showing that you are annoyed: Excuse me, but I think you’re mistaken.Excuse me, sir, but you can’t park there!
3 used when you are leaving the room for a short time: Excuse me a minute, I’ll be right back.
4 (especially American English) used for saying sorry for something you have done: Excuse me, did I step on your toe?
5 (especially American English) used when you did not hear what somebody said and you want them to repeat it
See also: excuse

exˌcuse/ˌpardon my ˈFrench

(informal, humorous) used for saying you are sorry when you have used or are going to use rude or offensive language: Ouch, bloody hell! Oops, excuse my French!If you’ll pardon my French, he’s a bloody fool.
See also: excuse, french, pardon

ˌpardon ˈme

(spoken)
1 (especially American English) used to ask somebody to repeat something because you did not hear it or do not understand it: ‘You look miles away.’ ‘Pardon me?’
2 used by some people to say ‘sorry’ when they have accidentally made a rude noise or done something wrong
See also: pardon

ˌpardon me for ˈdoing something

(informal) used to show that you are upset or offended by the way that somebody has spoken to you: ‘This is a meeting for women only, so get out and mind your own business.’ ‘Oh, pardon me for existing!’‘Oh, just shut up.’ ‘Well, pardon me for breathing!’
See also: pardon, something

if you’ll pardon the expression

phr. excuse the expression I am about to say. This thing is—if you’ll pardon the expression—loused up. I’m really jacked, if you’ll pardon the expression.
See also: expression, if, pardon

Pardon my French

and Excuse my French
sent. Excuse my use of swear words or taboo words.; Excuse my choice of vocabulary. (Does not refer to real French.) What she needs is a kick in the butt, if you’ll excuse my French.
See also: french, pardon

(Well,) pardon me for living!

and Excuse me for breathing! and Excuse me for living!
tv. I am SOOO sorry! (A very sarcastic response to a rebuke, seeming to regret the apparent offense of even living.) A: You are blocking my view. Please move. B: Well, pardon me for living! You say you were here first? Well excuse me for breathing!
See also: pardon

pardon me for living!

verb
See also: pardon

beg (someone's) pardon

Used to introduce a polite request.
See also: beg, pardon

beg to differ

To disagree in a polite manner.
See also: beg, differ

Excuse me

1. Used to acknowledge and ask forgiveness for an action that could cause offense.
2. Used to request that a statement be repeated.
See also: excuse

pardon/excuse my French

Please excuse the strong language. Exactly why French should mean “bad language” is not known, but this usage dates from the late 1800s. Eric Partridge speculated that the phrase was picked up by British soldiers in France during World War I and was first recorded during this period. However, given that language such as the F-word has become commonplace in popular entertainment and public life, this cliché is probably obsolescent, if not obsolete. Also see swear like a trooper; you should excuse the expression.
See also: excuse, french, pardon

pardon my French

Please excuse my language. In the days when language propriety was more of an issue than it is now, using a word or phrase that was “unfit for mixed company” was likely to lead to embarrassment. Since French was considered a racy language, people excused themselves with “pardon my French.”
See also: french, pardon
References in classic literature ?
"This," he sighed reproachfully, "is the Pardons' Pew," and shut them in.
"I oughtn't to have done it," said Lady Conant apologetically, "but there has been no one at Pardons for so long that you'll forgive my poaching.
Such-an-one.) After lunch Lady Conant talked to her explicitly of maternity as that is achieved in cottages and farm-houses remote from aid, and of the duty thereto of the mistress of Pardons.
Cloke about Mary." (This was the sister of the telegraphist, promoted to be sewing-maid at Pardons.) "Coming?"
She spoke likewise to her daughter Mary, sewing maid at Pardons, and to Mary's best new friend, the five-foot-seven imported London house-maid, who taught Mary to trim hats, and found the country dullish.
"I only want to say that I should hate any one who bought Pardons ten times worse than I used to hate the second Mrs.
(There's never been any trouble over the birth of an heir at Pardons.) Now where the dooce is it?" She felt largely in her leather-boundskirt and drew out a small silver mug.
A Canadian pardon (also known as a record suspension) allows for the removal of your criminal record from public view.
The King also pardoned 262 inmates on Monday, August 19, the eve of the King and People Revolution Day.Rabat King Mohammed VI offered his royal pardon to 443 inmates.
People who have been convicted of a crime in California may apply to the Governor for a pardon.
CAIRO -- 8 January 2019: President Abdel Fatah al-Sisi issued on Thursday a decree to pardon 513 prisoners on the occasion of Eid El-Adha.
The Centre for Policy Alternatives (CPA) expresses its deep shock and concern over the Presidential pardon of Galagoda Aththe Gnanasara Thero, who was released from prison.
President of Tajikistan Emomali Rahmon refused to pardon 99 people convicted to various terms of imprisonment, Asia Plus reports.
He was commenting on a statement by PAS secretary-general Datuk Takiyuddin Hassan who insisted he was correct in calling PKR president Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim a former convict despite the royal pardon granted to the latter.
Summary: The prisoners, who fulfill the conditions for pardon, should be released immediately.