parcel

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bag and baggage

With all of one's possessions. You need to be out of your dorm room, bag and baggage, by Monday morning.
See also: and, bag, baggage

parcel (someone or something) out

To divide people or things into smaller groups and distribute them to others. A: "I don't know how we're going to manage such a large group of kids in this part of town." B: "Why don't we parcel them out for the day?" The teacher told Tom to parcel the box of cookies to everyone in class.
See also: out, parcel

part and parcel

Some essential or fundamental part or aspect. Dealing with tantrums is part and parcel of raising a toddler. I'm afraid customer complaints are part and parcel of this job.
See also: and, parcel, part

bag and baggage

 and part and parcel
with one's luggage; with all one's possessions. Sally showed up at our door bag and baggage one Sunday morning. All right, if you won't pay the rent, out with you, bag and baggage! Get all your stuff—part and parcel—out of here!
See also: and, bag, baggage

parcel someone or something out

Fig. to divide up and send or give away people or things. Carla parceled all the uniforms out so everyone would have one to wear for the parade. We will parcel out the children for the summer.
See also: out, parcel

parcel something up

to wrap something up in a package. Would you parcel the papers up and set them in the corner? Parcel up the files and place them on top of the file cabinet.
See also: parcel, up

bag and baggage

All of one's belongings, especially with reference to departing with them; completely, totally. For example, The day he quit his job, John walked out, bag and baggage. Originating in the 1400s, this phrase at first meant an army's property, and to march off bag and baggage meant that the departing army was not leaving anything behind for the enemy's use. By the late 1500s, it had been transferred to other belongings.
See also: and, bag, baggage

parcel out

Divide into parts and distribute, as in She parceled out the remaining candy among the children. This idiom uses parcel in the sense of "divide into small portions." [Mid-1500s]
See also: out, parcel

part and parcel

An essential or basic element, as in Traveling is part and parcel of Zach's job. Used since the 15th century as a legal term, with part meaning "a portion" and parcel "something integral with a whole," this idiom began to be used more loosely from about 1800. Although both nouns have the same basic meaning, the redundancy lends emphasis.
See also: and, parcel, part

part and parcel

COMMON If one thing is part and parcel of another, it is involved or included in it and cannot be separated from it. Strong views and humour were part and parcel of our home life. Difficult times are part and parcel of being a professional.
See also: and, parcel, part

bag and baggage

with all your belongings.
See also: and, bag, baggage

pass the parcel

a situation in which movement or exchange takes place, but no one gains any advantage.
Pass the parcel is the name of a children's game in which a parcel is passed round to the accompaniment of music. When the music stops, the child holding the parcel is allowed to open it.
1998 Times People who won the initial franchises have made the money…Any movement from now on is just a game of pass the parcel, really.
See also: parcel, pass

be part and parcel of

be an essential feature or element of.
Both part and parcel ultimately come from Latin pars meaning ‘part’ and in this phrase they have virtually identical senses. The phrase is first recorded in mid 16th-century legal parlance; it is now used in general contexts to emphasize that the item mentioned is absolutely integral to the whole.
1998 Spectator It's not enough for people just to shrug their shoulders and say, ‘Well, that is part and parcel of being in public life’.
See also: and, of, parcel, part

ˌbag and ˈbaggage

with all your belongings: If you don’t pay the rent, you’ll be thrown out, bag and baggage.
See also: and, bag, baggage

be part and parcel of something

be an essential part of something: Long hours spent planning lessons are part and parcel of a teacher’s job.
See also: and, of, parcel, part, something

parcel out

v.
To divide something into parts or portions for distribution: The teacher parceled out the cookies to the pupils. I parceled the free tickets out to my friends.
See also: out, parcel

parcel up

v.
To gather or tie something together in a tight package; wrap up: He parceled up the clothes and took them to the yard sale. She is going to parcel those dry goods up and deliver them to the shelter.
See also: parcel, up

bag and baggage

1. With all one's belongings.
2. To a complete degree; entirely.
See also: and, bag, baggage

part and parcel

A basic or essential part: Working overtime is part and parcel of my job.
See also: and, parcel, part
References in classic literature ?
Wragge was still occupied in sorting her parcels on her narrow little bed.
Even this, his usual sentiment at meal times, one of his innocent delusions (for his appetite was always obstinate, and flatly contradicted him), awoke no smile in the face of his little wife, who stood among the parcels, pushing the cake-box slowly from her with her foot, and never once looked, though her eyes were cast down too, upon the dainty shoe she generally was so mindful of.
And most certainly there was nothing wonderful about the fact that Flambeau should have it all his own way with such a silly sheep as the man with the umbrella and the parcels.
I soon emptied the hogshead of the bread, and wrapped it up, parcel by parcel, in pieces of the sails, which I cut out; and, in a word, I got all this safe on shore also.
When he undid the parcel which Bertrade had tossed to him he found that it contained a beautifully wrought ring set with a single opal.
Quick then," cried John, "as there is still time, let us convey to him directions to burn the parcel.
Van Horn called her his parcel of trouble, and he was anxious to be rid of the parcel, without, however, the utter annihilation of the parcel.
Shortly after Miss Ladd had taken her departure, a parcel arrived for Emily, bearing the name of a bookseller printed on the label.
Before they could start, however, the awful spectacle of a little dog trotting out of the room with a paper parcel in his mouth, made Polly clasp her hands with the despairing cry: "My bonnet
Leave these papers with my clerk, then,' said Ralph, producing a small parcel, 'and tell him to wait till I come home.
In the month of June last, do you remember a parcel arriving for Mr.
the world is come to a fine pass indeed, if we are all fools, except a parcel of round-heads and Hanover rats.
Not at all, if you'll just wait till they bring out a parcel from the office.
And Monsieur de Marquet explained that there were on the dust of the pavement marks of two footsteps, as well as the impression, freshly-made, of a heavy rectangular parcel, the marks of the cord with which it had been fastened being easily distinguished.
On finding myself alone in my room, I naturally turned my attention to the parcel which appeared to have so strangely intimidated the fresh-coloured young footman.