paradise

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trouble in paradise

cliché Stress, difficulty, unhappiness, or discontentment in what is thought to be a happy or stable situation, often a marriage or romantic relationship. I think that's David's husband over there flirting with the bartender. Surely there isn't trouble in paradise already? It looks like there might be trouble in paradise for the tech giant, as news is leaking of a major internal power struggle within the company.
See also: paradise, trouble

live in a fool's paradise

To be in a happy state for foolish, unfounded, or delusional reasons. We were living in a fool's paradise thinking that the financial successes of the early 2000s would last forever.
See also: live, paradise

a fool's paradise

A happy state that one inhabits for foolish, unfounded, or delusional reasons. We were living in a fool's paradise thinking that the financial successes of the early 2000s would last forever.
See also: paradise

be living in a fool's paradise

To be in a happy state for foolish, unfounded, or delusional reasons. We were living in a fool's paradise thinking that the financial successes of the early 2000s would last forever.
See also: living, paradise

fool's paradise

Fig. a state of being happy for foolish or unfounded reasons. I'm afraid that Sue's marital happiness is a fool's paradise; there are rumors that her husband is unfaithful. Fred is confident that he'll get a big raise this year, but I think he's living in a fool's paradise.
See also: paradise

paradise (on earth)

Fig. a place on earth that is as lovely as paradise. The retirement home was simply a paradise on earth. The beach where we went for our vacation was a paradise.

fool's paradise

State of delusive contentment or false hope. For example, Joan lived in a fool's paradise, looking forward to a promotion she would never get. This expression was first recorded in 1462.
See also: paradise

be living in a fool's paradise

If someone is living in a fool's paradise, they believe wrongly that their situation is good, when really it is not. Anyone who believes that this deal heralds a golden new era for the European air traveller is living in a fool's paradise. Note: You can also use a fool's paradise on its own to mean a situation where someone thinks things are good, but really they are not. Mrs Deedes looks much happier. But surely hers is a fool's paradise.
See also: living, paradise

a fool’s ˈparadise

a state of happiness which cannot last because something which you have not thought of is threatening to destroy it: You’ve been living in a fool’s paradise. How long do you think we can go on spending our money without earning more?
See also: paradise

fool's paradise, a

Bliss based on illusion, ignorance, or misunderstanding. The expression dates from the fifteenth century, when it appeared in print in William Paston’s letters (1462: “I wold not be in a folis paradyce”). It recurs again and again, in numerous sixteenth-century sources (including Pettie, Lyly, and Shakespeare), and was certainly a cliché by the time George Bernard Shaw wrote, “Beguiling tedious hours with romances and fairy tales and fools’ paradises” (Misalliance, 1910).
References in classic literature ?
As a whole, by the consent of all competent judges, 'Paradise Lost' is worthy of its theme, perhaps the greatest that the mind of man can conceive, namely 'to justify the ways of God.' Of course there are defects.
'Nativity Ode' onward, is like a rich mosaic of gems borrowed from a great range of classical and modern authors, and in 'Paradise Lost' the allusions to literature and history give half of the romantic charm and very much of the dignity.
It was soon after this third marriage that Paradise Lost was finished and published.
People now came to visit the author of Paradise Lost, as before they had come to visit great Cromwell's secretary.
There is an honored old tradition that the immense garden which Damascus stands in was the Garden of Eden, and modern writers have gathered up many chapters of evidence tending to show that it really was the Garden of Eden, and that the rivers Pharpar and Abana are the "two rivers" that watered Adam's Paradise. It may be so, but it is not paradise now, and one would be as happy outside of it as he would be likely to be within.
Some of them place the "happy hunting-grounds," their ideal paradise, among the recesses of these mountains; but say that they are invisible to living men.
The birds of paradise fled at our approach, and truly I despaired of getting near one when Conseil, who was walking in front, suddenly bent down, uttered a triumphal cry, and came back to me bringing a magnificent specimen.
But if my wishes were satisfied by the possession of the bird of paradise, the Canadian's were not yet.
This Gowan when he had talked about a Paradise, had gone up to her and taken her hand.
"I endeavoured to crush these fears and to fortify myself for the trial which in a few months I resolved to undergo; and sometimes I allowed my thoughts, unchecked by reason, to ramble in the fields of Paradise, and dared to fancy amiable and lovely creatures sympathizing with my feelings and cheering my gloom; their angelic countenances breathed smiles of consolation.
I will not conceal from you that the document ends with certain legal phrases about the unpleasant things that may happen if the money is not paid; but meanwhile, ladies and gentlemen, let me assure you that I am comfortably off here for accommodation, wine and cigars, and bid you for the present a sportsman-like welcome to the luxuries of the Paradise of Thieves."
Why does our brigand-courier call this his chief fortress and the Paradise of Thieves?
Another order was given; there was a noise of dismounting, and a tall officer with cocked hat, a grey imperial, and a paper in his hand appeared in the gap that was the gate of the Paradise of Thieves.
"In short," said Muscari, "to the real Paradise of Thieves."
"A jester might say this is just like Paradise. You are Eve, and I am the old Other One come to tempt you in the disguise of an inferior animal.