parade

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Related to parades: Pardes

hit parade

Any listing or inventory of the best or most popular persons or things in a given category. Anthony's bookshelves are a veritable hit parade of classic literature.
See also: hit, parade

parade of horribles

A series of many misdeeds or misfortunes. A: "Why did you leave your job?" B: "I can't even begin to talk about the parade of horribles that happened to me while I was working there." The recent news cycle has just been a parade of horribles, with one tragedy after the next.
See also: of, parade

rain on (one's) parade

To ruin one's plans or temper one's excitement. I hate to rain on your parade, but I think your A in chemistry was actually a clerical error. Mom really rained on our parade by chaperoning our school dance.
See also: on, parade, rain

parade by

1. To walk, march, or pass by (someone or something) in a showy, ostentatious fashion, typically to flaunt something or gain others' attention. He kept parading by my desk trying to get me to notice his brand new Rolex watch. Ugh, I hate the way they parade by our school like that after they win a football game.
2. To flaunt or exhibit someone or something in a showy, ostentatious fashion in front of someone else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "parade" and "by." My dad always tried to parade me by his boss when I went to work with him. I guess he wanted to show he was a family man.
See also: by, parade

parade in front of (someone or something)

1. To walk, march, or pass by someone or something in a showy, ostentatious fashion, typically to flaunt something or gain others' attention. He kept parading in front of my desk trying to get me to notice his brand new Rolex watch. Ugh, I hate the way they parade in front of our school like that after they win a football game.
2. To flaunt or exhibit someone or something in a showy, ostentatious fashion in front of someone else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "parade" and "in." My dad always tried to parade me in front of his boss when I went to work with him. I guess he wanted to show he was a family man.
See also: front, of, parade

parade out

To flaunt or exhibit someone or something in a showy, ostentatious fashion in public. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "parade" and "out." She loves parading out her expensive sports car whenever she gets a chance. I wish the principal wouldn't parade us out like this. We got high scores on our tests, for crying out loud—it's not like we cured cancer or anything.
See also: out, parade

parade by (someone)

to march past someone in a parade or as if in a parade. The soldiers paraded by the commander in chief. Looking quite sharp, they paraded by.
See also: by, parade

parade (someone or an animal) out

to bring or march someone or an animal out in public. He parades his children out every Sunday as they go to church. He paraded out all his children.
See also: out, parade

parade someone or something in front of someone or something

to exhibit someone or something in front of someone or something, as if in a parade. One by one, the teacher paraded the honor students in front of the parents. The sheriff paraded the suspects in front of the camera. The sheriff paraded the suspects in front of the victim.
See also: front, of, parade

rain on someone's parade

 and rain on someone or something
Fig. to spoil something for someone. I hate to rain on your parade, but your plans are all wrong. She really rained on our plans.
See also: on, parade, rain

hit parade

A listing of the most popular or best items or individuals of some kind, as in The library has a veritable hit parade of videos. This expression dates from the 1930s, when it was the name of a weekly radio show featuring the most popular songs as indicated by record sales.
See also: hit, parade

rain on one's parade

Spoil one's plans, as in The minority party in the legislature has tried hard to rain on the speaker's parade, but so far his agenda has prevailed . This expression conjures up the image of a downpour ruining a celebration such as a parade. [c. 1900]
See also: on, parade, rain

rain on someone's parade

JOURNALISM
If someone rains on your parade, they do something which spoils your plans or spoils an event that you hoped to enjoy. To make sure that all goes according to plan and no one rains on his parade, the president's safari will stay clear of trouble spots. It's irritating that he could rain on my parade by stealing the record before me.
See also: on, parade, rain

rain on somone's parade

prevent someone from enjoying an occasion or event; spoil someone's plans. informal, chiefly North American
See also: on, parade, rain

ˌrain on somebody’s ˈparade

(American English) spoil something for somebody: Drugs again rained on the Olympics’ parade as another athlete tested positive for an illegal substance.
See also: on, parade, rain

rain on someone’s parade

and rain on someone/something
in. to spoil something for someone. I hate to rain on your parade, but your plans are all wrong.
See also: on, parade, rain

hit parade

A listing of the most popular individuals or items of some kind, in order of rank. The term dates from the 1930s when it was the name of a weekly radio show playing the most popular songs as indicated by record sales. It was later extended to other circumstances, as in “That math professor is number one on the students’ hit parade.” A more recent locution is the Top 40, similarly rating songs on the basis of their sales.
See also: hit, parade

rain on someone's parade, to

To spoil someone’s plans or celebration. This term, which calls up a vivid image of a downpour spoiling elaborate floats and dampening spirits, has been around since about 1900. Sheila Rule, reporting on a plan to replace Britain’s House of Lords with an elected second chamber, wrote, “But the opposition Labor Party, which has long sought to rain on the Lords’ political parade, is once again aiming at those men and women” (New York Times, 1990).
See also: on, rain
References in periodicals archive ?
The ball, which had been held at the end of the day of masquerading, was now celebrated in the 1910s and 1920s by gay men in Greenwich Village, many of whom came in drag.(28) It is unclear whether male homosexuals had always been among the crossdressers in the Fantastics parade, or whether an entirely separate group of men had appropriated the ritual they might have witnessed in their neighborhood.
But he added: "What I'm against is parades for sprinters, which just tease them after they leave the paddock, and I'm also against the way it's done at Ascot, where horses parade and then have to turn sharply and canter down back in front of the stands.
The biggest job is to review the contracts with groups applying to be in the parade and then work out where to place them in the lineup.
Our town didn't have a parade on Veterans Day, no doubt since on Nov.
The event, organised by the Liverpool Provincial Grand Orange Lodge, is traditionally seen as the "Sunday before the Twelfth Parade" and usually attracts hundreds of people.
In the run-up to the parade, people are invited to take part in free workshops to create a lantern to carry during the parade.
Tenders are invited for Provision Of Parade Production Services
Azam-e-Pakistan parade will start from Liberty Roundabout and end at the same place after passing through Main Market Gulberg.
Nazarbaev comes to the parade site by special vehicle
"I am calling on the Loyal Orders to meet with local residents in areas where parades are seen as contentious and resolve the issues surrounding them before we move into the summer."
Immaculate Heart of Mary School, at the Saint Benedict Center in Harvard, has about 100 students in Grades 1 through 12 and has marched in 24 parades in South Boston.
For all past inaugural parades, the movement control function was performed by a joint ad hoc organization made up of individual augmentees known as the Armed Forces Inaugural Committee (AFIC).
Organizers want people to share their memories, stories, photos and movies of past holiday and Christmas parades to create a history, or memorial, of the event.
With large screens strategically positioned to enliven large venue parades, festivals, and special events - the network of screens allows the broadcast of live entertainment and other video content via large screen LED video display technology utilized at parade and events venues.