parade by

parade by

1. To walk, march, or pass by (someone or something) in a showy, ostentatious fashion, typically to flaunt something or gain others' attention. He kept parading by my desk trying to get me to notice his brand new Rolex watch. Ugh, I hate the way they parade by our school like that after they win a football game.
2. To flaunt or exhibit someone or something in a showy, ostentatious fashion in front of someone else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "parade" and "by." My dad always tried to parade me by his boss when I went to work with him. I guess he wanted to show he was a family man.
See also: by, parade

parade by (someone)

to march past someone in a parade or as if in a parade. The soldiers paraded by the commander in chief. Looking quite sharp, they paraded by.
See also: by, parade
References in classic literature ?
They marched him back to the parade by the way they had brought him, and there they halted, among a body of soldiers, at least twice as numerous as that which had taken him prisoner in the afternoon.
He faintly sniffed the atmosphere of a certain sort of seaside town that be did not specially care about, and, looking ahead along the parade by the sea, he saw something that put the matter beyond a doubt.
His Majesty the Sultan was accompanied during the parade by their highnesses, the chairmen of the State Council and Majlis Al Shura, their excellencies the ministers, advisers, commanders of SAF, RGO, SSF , ROP and the military and security apparatuses, honourable members of the State Council and members of Majlis, undersecretaries, governors, judges of the Governorate of Muscat, Omani Ambassadors at the Foreign Ministry, heads of the diplomatic missions of countries accredited to the Sultanate and walis.
The disabled Air Force veteran, 39, set up a Facebook page called Springfield Christmas Parade by the People for the People and launched a GoFundMe page from it to raise money to cover the costs.
His Majesty the Sultan was accompanied during the parade by their Highnesses, the Chairmen of the State Council and Majlis A'Shura, Ministers, Advisers, Commanders of SAF, RGO, ROP and the military and security units, honourable members of the State Council and members of Majlis A'Shura, undersecretaries, judges, heads of Diplomatic Missions of the sisterly and friendly countries accredited to the Sultanate, the military attaches, senior military commanders and officers, senior officials in the state, walis, a number of sheikhs and dignitaries and a number of commissioned and non-commissioned officers and personnel of SAF, RGO, ROP and other security units in the state.
There should be no type of parade, except a victory parade by the winner like after the Arc.
It is in this light that questions about the historical 'shape' of Irish-American identity and its constituent factors can be asked of the parade by historians, and highly suggestive answers given: ritual is in part the performance of identity, and the historian can 'get inside a group's head' with some certainty if he or she focuses on ritual enactments of self.