come to papa

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come to papa

1. An entreaty or encouragement—typically jocular—for something or someone to approach. Usually said by a man. "That's it, come to papa," I said to myself as the suspects neared our undercover camera. It's immature, I know, but I can't help but whisper "come to papa" every time the ATM dispenses my cash.
2. An entreaty by gamblers for good fortune, especially when throwing dice. Usually said by a man. I need a seven on this roll—come to papa!
See also: come
References in classic literature ?
"O, that's what troubles me, papa. You want me to live so happy, and never to have any pain,--never suffer anything,--not even hear a sad story, when other poor creatures have nothing but pain and sorrow, an their lives;--it seems selfish.
"Papa, you are such a good man, and so noble, and kind, and you always have a way of saying things that is so pleasant, couldn't you go all round and try to persuade people to do right about this?
'Respectable?' says Papa. 'Sir,' I say (for this last question of his outrages me, and I have done being familiar with him--'Sir!
'No bank-note, if you please, till my brave Englishman has earned it first.' 'Bank- note!' says Papa, in a great surprise, 'who talked of bank-note?
Then papa will know what it is to live with a woman who claims all her rights.
I have told papa that I can think of Richard as a friend, but not as a husband.
Even if he proposed parting us, papa wouldn't allow it."
'If I am unluckily obliged to carry a cap about with me, which is yours and fits you,' pursued Mrs Gowan, 'don't blame me for its pattern, Papa Meagles, I beg!'
'Now, Papa Meagles, Papa Meagles,' said Mrs Gowan, who became extremely deliberate and prepossessing in manner whenever that gentleman became at all warm, 'perhaps to prevent confusion, I had better speak for myself than trouble your kindness to speak for me.
"Will you, then, mention it to papa?--I think it would be better to write to him." She blushed and looked at him as the garden flowers look at us when we walk forth happily among them in the transcendent evening light: is there not a soul beyond utterance, half nymph, half child, in those delicate petals which glow and breathe about the centres of deep color?
Did you observe, papa, that Frank looked sadly out of spirits yesterday?"
'Papa told you not to say any bad words, and you can't open your mouth without one.
Such was, and in such an attitude sat Miss Snevellicci's papa, who had been in the profession ever since he had first played the ten- year-old imps in the Christmas pantomimes; who could sing a little, dance a little, fence a little, act a little, and do everything a little, but not much; who had been sometimes in the ballet, and sometimes in the chorus, at every theatre in London; who was always selected in virtue of his figure to play the military visitors and the speechless noblemen; who always wore a smart dress, and came on arm-in-arm with a smart lady in short petticoats,--and always did it too with such an air that people in the pit had been several times known to cry out 'Bravo!' under the impression that he was somebody.
"Well," said she, "this is--most surprising--most painful--most extraordinary--what will Papa say?--that George should fling away such a superb establishment as was offered to him but at any rate he has found a very brave champion in you, Captain Dobbin.
"What is a Pietist, papa?" asked Kitty, dismayed to find that what she prized so highly in Madame Stahl had a name.