pan

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Related to panned: panned out

the best thing since sliced pan

Extremely good, wonderful, impressive, or revolutionary, often said facetiously or sarcastically. Taken from the more common expression "the best thing since sliced bread." In this usage, a pan, in which a loaf of bread is baked, refers to the loaf of bread itself. Primarily heard in Ireland. I don't care what you say, I think she's the best thing since sliced pan! This new smartphone design really is the best thing since sliced pan.
See also: pan, since, slice, thing

go down the pan

To fail or be completely and irreversibly wasted, lost, or destroyed. Primarily heard in UK. In an instant, we saw all our hopes for our business go down the pan.
See also: down, pan

down the pan

Completely and irreversibly wasted, lost, or destroyed. Primarily heard in UK. In an instant, we saw all our hopes for our business go down the pan. All those years of research down the pan. I guess it's back to the drawing board.
See also: down, pan

Peter Pan syndrome

A psychological state or condition in which a grown person cannot or refuses to act like an adult; a stubborn and persistent immaturity found in an adult person. I seem cursed to only find men who have some damned Peter Pan syndrome. I'm tired of going out with guys who act like children!
See also: pan, peter, syndrome

flash in the pan

Someone or something whose success or popularity is short-lived. With only one hit song, it was obvious that the young pop star was going to be just another flash in the pan. The new startup created a lot of buzz, but it ended up being just another flash in the pan, out of business after just two years.
See also: flash, pan

down the drain

1. In a state of failure or ruination. My father's company is now going down the drain because of the incompetent new CEO.
2. Squandered or wastefully discarded. All of our savings have gone down the drain ever since Jack had his little gambling spree in Las Vegas.
See also: down, drain

out of the frying pan (and) into the fire

From a bad, stressful, or dangerous situation into one that is even worse. If you use credit cards to pay off a debt, you're jumping out of the frying pan into the fire. I thought moving up to the manager's position, I'd have an easier time in the restaurant, but I went out of the frying pan and into the fire!
See also: fire, fry, of, out, pan

pan out

1. To work out or conclude in a successful or pleasing manner. I'm delighted with how that all panned out! I hope this decision pans out for him.
2. To rest or fall asleep, especially in a sprawling or prostrate position. Tom is panned out on the sofa, if you're looking for him. Would you mind fixing dinner tonight? I need to go pan out for a little while.
See also: out, pan

flash in the pan

Fig. someone or something that draws a lot of attention for a very brief time. I'm afraid that my success as a painter was just a flash in the pan. Tom had hoped to be a major film star, but his career was only a flash in the pan.
See also: flash, pan

If ifs and ands were pots and pans (there'd be no work for tinkers' hands).

Prov. Wishing for things is useless. (Often said in reply to someone who says something beginning with "If only....") Daughter: If only we didn't have to move out of town, I'd be the happiest girl in the world. Grandmother: If ifs and ands were pots and pans, there'd be no work for tinkers' hands.
See also: and, if, pan, pot

*out of the frying pan (and) into the fire

Fig. from a bad situation to a worse situation. (*Typically: get ~; go ~; jump ~.) When I tried to argue about my fine for a traffic violation, the judge charged me with contempt of court. I really went out of the frying pan into the fire. I got deeply in debt. Then I really got out of the frying pan into the fire when I lost my job.
See also: fire, fry, of, out, pan

pan across to someone or something

to turn or rotate a film or television camera so that the picture follows movement or moves to and settles on someone or something. The camera panned across to Mary, who was sitting, looking out the window. The camera operator panned across to the window on the opposite side of the room.
See also: across, pan

pan for something

to search for a precious metal, usually gold, by using a pan to locate the bits of metal in sand and gravel in a stream bed. When I was in Alaska, I panned for gold in a little stream set aside for tourists. The old prospector spent many hours panning for gold.
See also: pan

pan in

(on someone or something) Go to zoom in (on someone or something).
See also: pan

pan out

 
1. and zoom out to move back to a wider angle picture using a zoom lens. The camera zoomed out. Pan out at this point in the script and give a wider view of the scene.
2. Go to turn out (all right).
See also: out, pan

pan over someone or something

to turn or rotate a film or television camera so that the picture moves across a view of someone or something. The camera panned over the skyline, picking up interesting cloud formations. It panned over Roger as if he weren't there—which is exactly the effect the director wanted.
See also: over, pan

turn out

[for something] to aim outward. Her toes turned out just right for a ballet dancer. The legs of the chair turned out just a little, adding a bit of stability.
See also: out, turn

turn out (all right)

 and pan out; work out (all right)
to end satisfactorily. I hope everything turns out all right. Oh, yes. It'll all pan out. Things usually work out, no matter how bad they seem.
See also: out, turn

turn out

(for something) [for people, especially an audience] to [leave home to] attend some event. A lot of people turned out for our meeting. Almost all the residents turned out for the meeting.
See also: out, turn

turn out

somehow to end in a particular way, such as well, badly, all right, etc. I hope everything turns out all right. The party did not turn out well.
See also: out, turn

turn out (that)

to happen; to end up; to result. After it was all over, it turned out that both of us were pleased with the bargain. Have you heard how the game turned out?
See also: out, turn

turn someone out

 
1. Lit. to send someone out of somewhere. I didn't pay my rent, so the manager turned me out. I'm glad it's not winter. I'd hate to turn out someone in the snow.
2. Fig. to train or produce someone with certain skills or talents. The state law school turns lawyers out by the dozen. A committee accused the state university of turning out too many veterinarians.
See also: out, turn

turn something out

 
1. to manufacture or produce something in numbers. The factory turns too few cars out. The factory turns out about seventy-five cars a day.
2. to turn off a light. Please turn the hall light out. Turn out the light.
See also: out, turn

zoom in

 (on someone or something)
1. . and pan in (on someone or something) to move in to a close-up picture of someone or something, using a zoom lens or a similar lens. The camera zoomed in on the love scene. The camera operator panned in slowly.
2. . to fly or move rapidly at someone or something. The hawk zoomed in on the sparrow. The angry bees zoomed in on Jane and stung her. When the door opened, the cat zoomed in.
3. . to concentrate on a matter related to someone or a problem. Let's zoom in on this matter of debt. She zoomed in and dealt quickly with the problem at hand.
See also: zoom

down the drain

On the way to being lost or wasted; disappearing. For example, Buying new furniture when they can't take it with them is just pouring money down the drain , or During the Depression huge fortunes went down the drain. This metaphoric term alludes to water going down a drain and being carried off. [Colloquial; c. 1920] For a synonym, see down the tubes.
See also: down, drain

flash in the pan

An effort or person that promises great success but fails. For example, His second novel proved to be a flash in the pan, or We had high hopes for the new director, but she was a flash in the pan. This metaphoric term alludes to the 17th-century flintlock musket, which could be fired only when the flash of the priming powder in the lockpan ignited the charge in the bore. When it failed to ignite, there was only a flash in the pan and the gun did not shoot.
See also: flash, pan

out of the frying pan into the fire

From a bad situation to one that is much worse. For example, After Karen quit the first law firm she went to one with even longer hours-out of the frying pan into the fire . This expression, a proverb in many languages, was first recorded in English in 1528.
See also: fire, fry, of, out, pan

pan out

Turn out well, succeed, as in If I don't pan out as a musician, I can always go back to school. This expression alludes to washing gold from gravel in a pan. [Mid-1800s]
See also: out, pan

turn out

1. Shut off, as in He turned out the light. [Late 1800s]
2. Arrive or assemble for an event, as in A large number of voters turned out for the rally. [Mid-1700s]
3. Produce, as in They turn out three thousand cars a month. [Mid-1700s]
4. Be found to be in the end; also, end up, result, as in The rookie turned out to be a fine fielder, or The cake didn't turn out very well. [First half of 1700s] Also see turn out all right.
5. Equip, outfit, as in The bride was turned out beautifully. [First half of 1800s]
6. Get out of bed, as in Come on, children; time to turn out. [Colloquial; early 1800s]
7. Evict, expel, as in The landlord turned out his tenant. [Early 1500s]
See also: out, turn

down the drain

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

down the tubes

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

down the pan

BRITISH
COMMON If something is going down the drain, down the tubes or down the pan, it is getting worse or being destroyed and it is unlikely to recover. They were aware that their public image was rapidly going down the drain. People don't like to see marriages going down the tubes. Note: Words such as plughole and toilet are sometimes used instead of drain. Neil admitted recently that long working hours mean his personal life has gone down the toilet.
1. If money, work, or time has gone down the drain, down the tubes or down the pan, it has been lost or wasted. Over the years, the government has poured billions of dollars down the drain propping up its national airlines and other firms. You have ruined everything — my perfect plans, my great organization. All those years of work are down the drain. Note: Words such as plughole and toilet are sometimes used instead of drain. Millions of dollars have gone down the plughole.
See also: down, drain

a flash in the pan

COMMON
1. If an achievement or success is a flash in the pan, it is unlikely to be repeated or to last. In the days following Beckon's victory, the British establishment has gone out of its way to try and dismiss the result as a flash in the pan.
2. If someone who has had a success is a flash in the pan, their success is unlikely to be repeated. Hopefully now I'll be taken seriously, I'm not a flash in the pan. Note: You can use flash-in-the-pan before a noun. Hers is no flash-in-the-pan talent, but a major and mature new voice. Note: This expression has its origins in the way that an old-fashioned gun worked. Pulling the trigger produced a spark which set light to a small amount of gunpowder held in the `pan'. This in turn lit the rest of the gunpowder. However, if it failed to do so there was just a `flash in the pan' and the gun did not fire properly. `Hang fire' has a similar origin.
See also: flash, pan

out of the frying pan into the fire

or

from the frying pan into the fire

If someone has gone out of the frying pan into the fire or from the frying pan into the fire, they have moved from a bad situation to an even worse one. I was hoping to get my career back on track after a bad time at Villa. But as it turned out, I'd gone out of the frying pan into the fire. Having finally left one bad relationship, she jumped from the frying pan into the fire.
See also: fire, fry, of, out, pan

down the drain

totally wasted or spoilt. informal
1930 W. Somerset Maugham The Breadwinner All his savings are gone down the drain.
See also: down, drain

flash in the pan

a thing or person whose sudden but brief success is not repeated or repeatable.
This phrase developed from the priming of a firearm, the flash being from an explosion of gunpowder within the lock.
1998 New Scientist But Java…may turn out to be flash in the pan: books on human– computer interaction struggle to stay abreast of rapid developments in computing.
See also: flash, pan

out of the frying pan into the fire

from a bad situation to one that is worse.
See also: fire, fry, of, out, pan

go down the pan

reach a stage of abject failure or uselessness.
1997 Ian Rankin Black & Blue My company's just about given up trying to sell to the oil industry. They'd rather buy Yank or Scandinavian…no wonder Scotland's down the pan.
See also: down, pan

(go) down the ˈdrain

(British English also (go) down the ˈplughole) (informal) (be) wasted or lost; (get) much worse: He watched his business, which had taken so long to build up, go slowly down the drain.
See also: down, drain

a ˌflash in the ˈpan

(informal) a success which lasts for a short time and is not likely to be repeated: He scored a lot of goals early in the season, but hasn’t scored any since, so it may have been just a flash in the pan.This refers to an old type of gun. Sometimes the gunpowder in the pan (= a small container at the top of the gun) exploded but failed to set fire to the gunpowder inside the gun with the result that the gun did not fire a bullet.
See also: flash, pan

out of the ˈfrying pan (and) into the ˈfire

(saying) out of one situation of danger or difficulty into another (usually worse) one: It was a case of out of the frying pan into the fire: she divorced her husband, who was an alcoholic, and then married another man with the same problem.
See also: fire, fry, of, out, pan

go down the ˈpan

(British English, slang) be wasted or spoiled: That’s another brilliant idea down the pan.
Pan is an informal word for the bowl of a toilet.
See also: down, pan

pan out

v.
1. To prove successful, effective, or satisfactory; turn out well: I'm glad to see that your business plan has panned out.
2. To have some specified result: My plans panned out poorly.
See also: out, pan

turn out

v.
1. To turn some light off: We turned out the lights. I turned the light out.
2. To arrive or assemble, as for a public event or entertainment: Many protesters have turned out for the rally.
3. To produce something, as by a manufacturing process; make something: The assembly line turns out 100 cars every hour. The artist turns a new painting out every week.
4. To be found to be something, as after experience or trial: The rookie turned out to be the team's best hitter. It turns out that he knew about the crime all along.
5. To end up; result: The cake turned out beautifully.
6. To equip someone or something; outfit someone or something. Used chiefly in the passive: The troops were turned out lavishly. They were turned out in brilliant colors.
7. To get out of bed: We turned out before the sun was up.
8. To get someone out of bed: The babysitter turned the children out at 8:00.
9. To evict someone; expel someone: The landlord turned out the tenants. The hotel turned the rowdy guests out.
See also: out, turn

zoom in

v.
1. To simulate movement toward an object with or as if with a zoom lens: The director zoomed in on a face in the crowd. The shot zooms in through a window to a family sitting at a table.
2. To increase the apparent size of part of an image of something in order to view it more closely, as when using a magnifying lens: The camera can't zoom in far enough to capture their expressions. Zoom in on this part of the document too see whether the text lines up with the illustration.
3. To enter rapidly: The firefighting helicopter zoomed in to pick up more water.
4. zoom in on To narrow and intensify the examination of someone or something: In our presentation we zoomed in on the financial problems facing the company.
See also: zoom

down the drain

mod. gone; wasted. A lot of money went down the drain in that Wilson deal.
See also: down, drain

pan

n. the face. (see also deadpan.) Look at that guy! I’ve never seen such an ugly pan in my life.

pan out

in. [for something] to work out or turn out all right. Don’t worry. Everything will pan out okay.
See also: out, pan

zoom in

verb
See also: zoom

down the drain

To or into the condition of being wasted or lost: All of our best laid plans are down the drain.
See also: down, drain

flash in the pan

One that promises great success but fails.
See also: flash, pan

flash in the pan

An ultimate disappointment after a promising start. Flintlock muskets and pistols had a priming pan that was filled with a small quality of gunpowder. When the trigger was pulled, the flint struck a piece of steel to create a spark that ignited the powder, which in turn set off the main gunpowder charge to launch the musket ball. Whenever the flint-and-steel spark failed to light the main charge, there was a flash in the pan, but no shot. And that was the disappointment after a potentially useful beginning.
See also: flash, pan