panic

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Related to panics: Moral panics

press the panic button

To overreact to a negative situation with an inordinate amount of fear, alarm, or confusion. If you're going to be a successful boss, you can't press the panic button every time your company has a minor setback. New parents tend to press the panic button over every little sniffle their first baby gets.
See also: button, panic, press

hit the panic button

To overreact to a negative situation with an inordinate amount of fear, alarm, or confusion. If you're going to be a successful boss, you can't hit the panic button every time your company has a minor setback. New parents tend to hit the panic button over every little sniffle their first baby gets. You learn to chill out when you have more kids.
See also: button, hit, panic

panic stations

A shared feeling of extreme anxiety, stress, and urgency, especially in the face of a looming deadline. Even though we've been preparing for months, it's still been panic stations in the office as we get the product ready for launch.
See also: panic, station

push the panic button

To overreact to a negative situation with an inordinate amount of fear, alarm, or confusion. If you're going to be a successful boss, you can't push the panic button every time your company has a minor setback. New parents tend to push the panic button over every little sniffle their first baby gets. You learn to chill out when you have more kids.
See also: button, panic, push

hit the panic button

 and press the panic button; push the panic button
Fig. to panic suddenly. She hit the panic button and just went to pieces. Don't press the panic button. Relax and keep your eyes open.
See also: button, hit, panic

panic at something

to lose control in a frightening or shocking situation. Try not to panic at what you see. It will be a shock. Don't panic at the price of food. It will be worse next week.
See also: panic

panic someone by something

to make someone lose control by doing something. She panicked Denise by describing the event too vividly. She panicked her horse by jerking the reins too tightly.
See also: panic

push the panic button

Also, press the panic button. Overreact to a situation, as in Don't worry; Jane is always pushing the panic button, but I'm sure the baby's fine. This term originated during World War II, when certain bombers had a bell-warning system so that the crew could bail out if the plane was severely hit. Occasionally a pilot would push the button in error, when there was only minor damage, causing the crew to bail out unnecessarily. By 1950 the expression had been transferred to other kinds of overreaction.
See also: button, panic, push

press (or push or hit) the panic button

respond to a situation by panicking or taking emergency measures. informal
A panic button is a security device which can be used to raise the alarm in an emergency.
See also: button, panic, press

ˈpanic stations

(British English, informal) a situation in which people feel anxious and there is a lot of confused activity, especially because there is a lot to do in a short period of time: At the moment it’s panic stations in the office because we’re preparing for the president’s visit next week.In the navy, a call to action stations means that each sailor takes the position that they should have when in battle. Panic stations is a humorous comparison with this.
See also: panic, station

press/push the ˈpanic button

(British English) react in a sudden or an extreme way to something unexpected that has frightened you: Although the team lost yet another match on Saturday, their manager is refusing to press the panic button.
See also: button, panic, press, push

hit the panic button

and press the panic button and push the panic button
tv. to panic. She hit the panic button and just went to pieces. Don’t press the panic button until you think it through.
See also: button, hit, panic

press the panic button

verb
See also: button, panic, press

push the panic button

verb
See also: button, panic, push

panic

n. a very funny or exciting person or thing. Paul is a panic. He tells a joke a minute.
References in periodicals archive ?
CBT is a type of psychotherapy that trains your brain and body to overcome panic attacks and gets you to a point in which they no longer happen at all.
When suffering from a panic attack, people tend to breathe very quickly and the shallow breaths can cause them to feel even more stressed and helpless.
A private consortium of banks and other private entities took steps to bolster confidence amid the early 20th century panic.
One of the two main avenues of research on gender and panic disorder has built upon Fodor's (1974) attempt to account for the statistical gender gap by proposing that social expectations to be passive, fearful, and dependent have predisposed women to agoraphobia.
The concept of moral panic, of public hysteria over topics ranging from ritual child sex abuse to designer drugs to terrorism, is a regular theme of Jenkins' work (one he has promoted a little too facilely in treating the recent management scandal over sexual misconduct by Catholic priests).
Nininger City offers a unique opportunity to understand the real effects of a financial panic because, like many middle-class families of the time, it was held together by appearances, by presenting a positive image in the face of trying circumstances.
The likely trigger for such a panic will be a de facto bankruptcy of one of the major prefectures or municipal governments in Japan.
Panics in the pre-Federal Reserve period were located in the New York money market, even if they began within the interior of the country.
The definition of panic attack is based on diagnostic criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV)[1] (Table 1).
The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the Federal agency responsible for conducting and supporting research related to mental disorders, mental health, and the brain, is conducting a nationwide education program on panic disorder.
Other panics include the 1950s hubbub over horror-themed comic books; 1980s fusses over heavy metal, Satanism, and Dungeons & Dragons; and more recent furors over violent video games and the Goth subculture.
Moral panics of recent memory include the Joseph McCarthy anti-communist witchhunts of the 1950s and the satanic ritual abuse allegations of the 1980s.
But it's our cover story about the controversial painkiller OxyContin that most fully drives home how moral panics can cause immense pain and suffering.
Typically, sociologists have written about panics in which the purported threat was overblown (as with the rockers and mods) or entirely imaginary (as with the mythical Satanic child abuse rings of the late '80s and early '90s).
Although 40% of people with panic attacks never seek care for their attacks, those who do may use medical settings or mental health settings, or both.