pale

(redirected from paleness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to paleness: Anemia

(as) pale as a ghost

Exceptionally pale, as due to nausea or fear. I get terrible motion sickness, so I'm sure I was as pale as a ghost when I stumbled off the plane. She was pale as a ghost after that car nearly ran into her on the sidewalk.
See also: ghost, pale

(as) pale as death

Exceptionally pale, as due to nausea or fear. I get terrible motion sickness, so I'm sure I was as pale as a death when I stumbled off the plane. She was pale as a death after that car nearly ran into her on the sidewalk.
See also: death, pale

be beyond the pale

To be unacceptable or inappropriate. A "pale" is an area bounded by a fence. Disrupting my class is beyond the pale, young lady—go to the principal's office! Most people would consider stealing to be beyond the pale.
See also: beyond, pale

beyond the pale

Completely unacceptable or inappropriate. A "pale" is an area bounded by a fence. Disrupting my class is beyond the pale, young lady—go to the principal's office! Most people would consider stealing to be beyond the pale.
See also: beyond, pale

pale around the gills

Exceptionally pale, as due to nausea or fear. I get terrible motion sickness, so I'm sure I was a little pale around the gills when I stumbled off the plane. She was really pale around the gills after that car nearly ran into her on the sidewalk.
See also: around, gill, pale

pale at (something)

To become fearful of, nervous about, or averse to something. Typically followed by "the thought/notion of (something)." I know that David pales at the thought of flying in an airplane. We paled at the notion of shutting down the company that our great-great-grandfather created.
See also: pale

pale at the notion of (something)

To be made fearful, nervous, or sickened by thinking about something happening. I know that David pales at the notion of flying in an airplane. We paled at the notion of shutting down the company that our great-great-grandfather created.
See also: notion, of, pale

pale at the thought of (something)

To be made fearful, nervous, or sickened by thinking about something happening. I know that David pales at the thought of flying in an airplane. We paled at the thought of shutting down the company that our great-great-grandfather created.
See also: of, pale, thought

pale beside (someone or something)

To be or seem less important, impressive, or otherwise deficient when compared to someone or something else. All of my siblings are surgeons, so I always feel like my career in art pales beside theirs. Our work pales beside the things our predecessors created.
See also: beside, pale

pale by comparison

To be or seem less important, impressive, or otherwise deficient when compared to someone or something else. The film was enjoyable, but it pales by comparison to the original. Though that issue is indeed serious, it pales by comparison with the threat of drug abuse that is tearing the country apart.
See also: by, comparison, pale

pale in comparison

To be or seem less important, impressive, or otherwise deficient when compared to someone or something else. The film was enjoyable, but it pales in comparison to the original. Though that issue is indeed serious, it pales in comparison with the threat of drug abuse that is tearing the country apart.
See also: comparison, pale

pale into insignificance

To diminish or lessen in significance, importance, impact, or value, especially over time or compared to something else. The horrible tensions and violence that used to grip this city have started to pale into insignificance as we continue this period of peace and prosperity. I've found a bit of success with my work, but it pales into insignificance compared to the works of the writers who inspired me.
See also: insignificance, pale

pale next to (someone or something)

To be or seem less important, impressive, or otherwise deficient when compared to someone or something else. All of my siblings are surgeons, so I always feel like my career in art pales next to theirs. Our work pales next to the things our predecessors created.
See also: next, pale

beyond the pale

Fig. unacceptable; outlawed. (A. pale is a barrier made of wooden stakes.) Your behavior is simply beyond the pale. Because of Tom's rudeness, he's considered beyond the pale and is never asked to parties anymore.
See also: beyond, pale

pale around the gills

 and blue around the gills; green around the gills
Fig. looking sick. (The around can be replaced with about.) John is looking a little pale around the gills. What's wrong? Oh, I feel a little green about the gills.
See also: around, gill, pale

*pale as a ghost

 and *pale as death
very pale. (*Also: as ~.) Laura came into the room, as pale as a ghost. "What happened?" her friends gasped. What's the matter? You're pale as death!
See also: ghost, pale

pale at something

to become weak, frightened, or pale from fear of something or the thought of something. Bob paled at the thought of having to drive all the way back to get the forgotten suitcase. We paled at the notion that we would always be poor.
See also: pale

pale beside someone or something

Fig. to appear to be weak or unimportant when compared to someone or something. He is competent, but he pales beside Fran. My meager effort pales beside your masterpiece.
See also: beside, pale

pale by comparison

 and pale in comparison
Fig. to appear to be deficient in comparison to something else. My work pales by comparison with yours. You are a real pro.
See also: by, comparison, pale

beyond the pale

Outside the bounds of morality, good behavior or judgment; unacceptable. For example, She thought taking the boys to a topless show was beyond the pale. The noun pale, from the Latin palum, meant "a stake for fences" or "a fence made from such stakes." By extension it came to be used for an area confined by a fence and for any boundary, limit, or restriction, both of these meanings dating from the late 1300s. The pale referred to in the idiom is usually taken to mean the English Pale, the part of Ireland under English rule, and therefore, as perceived by its rulers, within the bounds of civilization.
See also: beyond, pale

beyond the pale

COMMON If a person or their behaviour is beyond the pale, they are completely unacceptable. Any kind of physical aggression from your partner is beyond the pale. In those days divorced women were considered beyond the pale. Note: `Pale' comes from the Latin `palum', meaning `stake', and in English it came to refer to a territorial boundary marked by a line of stakes. The area inside was regarded as civilized, but the area beyond the pale was seen as barbaric.
See also: beyond, pale

beyond the pale

outside the bounds of acceptable behaviour.
A pale (from Latin palus meaning ‘a stake’) is a pointed wooden post used with others to form a fence; from this it came to refer to any fenced enclosure. So, in literal use, beyond the pale meant the area beyond a fence. The term Pale was applied to various territories under English control and especially to the area of Ireland under English jurisdiction before the 16th century. The earliest reference ( 1547 ) to the Pale in Ireland as such draws the contrast between the English Pale and the ‘wyld Irysh’: the area beyond the pale would have been regarded as dangerous and uncivilized by the English.
See also: beyond, pale

pale into insignificance

lose importance or value.
See also: insignificance, pale

beˌyond the ˈpale

considered socially unacceptable: Her behaviour towards her employees is completely beyond the pale. She treats them like servants.A pale was a boundary made of wooden posts or the safe area inside this. In the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, the part of Ireland that was under English rule was called the Pale. The area outside this was beyond the Pale and considered wild and dangerous by the English.
See also: beyond, pale

ˈpale beside/next to something

,

ˈpale in/by comparison (with/to something)

,

ˈpale into insignificance

seem less important when compared with something else: Last year’s riots pale in comparison with this latest outburst of violence.
See also: beside, next, pale, something

beyond the pale

Irrevocably unacceptable or unreasonable: behavior that was quite beyond the pale.
See also: beyond, pale

beyond the pale

Unacceptable, outside the rules of society, morality, etc. The noun “pale,” from the Latin palum, meant a stake of the kind used to make fences, or a fence made of such stakes. By extension it came to mean the limits designated by a fence, at first literally and then figuratively. In the fourteenth century the English Pale was a name given to the part of Ireland then under English rule and therefore within the bounds of civilization (as perceived by the English). There was a similar pale around Calais. More figuratively still, the English printer William Caxton wrote in 1483, “The abbot and 21 monks went for to dwelle in deserte for to kepe more straytelye the profession of theyr pale.” Three centuries later and three thousand miles away, Thomas Jefferson referred to “within the pale of their own laws.”
See also: beyond, pale

beyond the pale

A pale, originally a stockade made of pales of wood, was an area under the authority of a certain official. In the 14th and 15th centuries the British ruled Dublin, the surrounding area was outside the law. Anyone or anything beyond the pale was considered savage and dangerous, and the express came to mean anything unacceptable or beyond the limits of accepted morality or conduct.
See also: beyond, pale
References in periodicals archive ?
Shallow cheeks and paleness alone did not speak of his pain.
Mohammed Al- Kamali, a specialist in general surgery, said that most of the time the symptoms of dengue fever are paleness, lost appetite and occasional bleeding from the mouth ,nose , intestines and skin.
Of the carnage, "[e]ntrails and organs lay starkly exposed where they had split from horrendous gashes torn into the soft paleness of flesh" or "Metal sliced through flesh.
It would have been higher, except for the paleness of the stone.
Summary: It was my intention not to be beaten by the first paleness of the morning.
Iranians celebrated the festival by lighting bonfires in public places and leapt over the flames shouting "Sorkhiye to az man, Zardiye man az to (Give me your redness and I will give you my paleness)".
Iranians celebrate the fire festival by lighting bonfires in public places on the night before the last Mar 17 and leaping over the flames shouting "Sorkhiye to az man, Zardiye man az to (Give me your redness and I will give you my paleness)".
"Warning signs for worsening PAD, also known as critical limb ischemia, are pain in the leg or foot, pain that is worsened by elevating the leg (such as at night while in bed), a sore on the leg or foot that is slow to heal, or color changes (blueness or paleness) in the foot," says Cleveland Clinic vascular specialist Heather Gornik, MD.
Of all signs, he says, the most clearcut is paleness of the mucous membranes--especially the gums, which may become almost white in color.
Bright colors fit paleness. The emphasis lies more on the eye shadowing than on long eyelashes.
The warning involves cases of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), a type of anemia that can cause fatigue, lethargy or abnormal paleness of the skin.
Patients who receive the Gardasil vaccine should sit or lie down in the office for at least 15 minutes after vaccination to prevent possible injury from falling during syncope, while being observed for paleness, sweating, dizziness, or other signs of a possible vasovagal reaction, the Food and Drug Administration recommended.
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Love Poem to Garlic stinking rose the heady scent of you tangy spicy most underrated year-round orb bulbous root incandescent moon invoked as deities by the Egyptians garlic each day with you is another day tripled stripped of your delicate covers your fire-spitting fresh rawness i love you unadulterated a shiver once i bite you medicinally you are a miracle fighting colds blood thinner anti-bacterial extraordinaire how to eat you raw & love it: peel the placenta-like cover julienne into fish sauce with red chili peppers lemon your bold paleness exposed i imagine you at every moment of every day
In the early and final nights of its cycle, the moon has a crescent shape, but whereas it reflects freshness and vigor in the early days, it rises in the latter part of its cycle as if it is weighed down by a heavy burden and looks worried and pale; the same paleness as an old date stalk.