pain

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pain

informal A particularly irritating or bothersome person or thing; a nuisance. Filing taxes is always such a pain. I wish I could afford to have someone else do it for me! Stop being a pain, Jeremy—you've been getting on my nerves all day!
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

pain

n. a bother; an irritating thing or person. Those long meetings are a real pain.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
"That may be; but the pill gave me a dreadful pain, just the same," said the boy.
Or that again which most nearly approaches to the condition of the individual--as in the body, when but a finger of one of us is hurt, the whole frame, drawn towards the soul as a center and forming one kingdom under the ruling power therein, feels the hurt and sympathizes all together with the part affected, and we say that the man has a pain in his finger; and the same expression is used about any other part of the body, which has a sensation of pain at suffering or of pleasure at the alleviation of suffering.
I should never have failed toward Lucy and Philip as I have done, if I had not been weak, selfish, and hard,--able to think of their pain without a pain to myself that would have destroyed all temptation.
The capacity for pain is not needed in the muscle, and it is not placed there,--is but little needed in the skin, and only here and there over the thigh is a spot capable of feeling pain.
But the poor doctor did look troubled, and had cause to do so, for just then Rose tried to laugh at Dolly charging into the room with a warming-pan, but could not, for the sharp pain took her breath away and made her cry out.
Our greatness will appear Then most conspicuous, when great things of small, Useful of hurtful, prosperous of adverse We can create, and in what place so e're Thrive under evil, and work ease out of pain Through labour and endurance.
The scratching pain of the contact made him draw a long breath through his clinched teeth.
As it was, it made me quite squeamish, though this nausea might have been due to the pain of my leg and exhaustion.
And wrath, and ferocity, and intent to destroy, passed out utterly from the tiger's inflamed brain, until he knew fear, again and again, always fear and only fear, utter and abject fear, of this human mite who searched him with such pain.
'discomfort' and 'pain.' Pain is a distinct sensory quality equivalent to heat and cold, and its intensity can be roughly graded according to the force expended in stimulation.
Thus our parting daily loseth Something of its bitter pain, And while learning this hard lesson, My great loss becomes my gain.
"For all that let me tell thee, brother Panza," said Don Quixote, "that there is no recollection which time does not put an end to, and no pain which death does not remove."
The next letter brought intelligence that the malady was fast increasing; and the poor sufferer's horror of death was still more distressing than his impatience of bodily pain. All his friends had not forsaken him; for Mr.
Only when alone together were they free from such outrage and pain. They spoke little even to one another, and when they did it was of very unimportant matters.
It's burning, searing pain to love her and leave her--but not to have loved her is unthinkable.