page

(redirected from pages)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to pages: white pages, yellow pages

(I'll) see you in the funny pages

old-fashioned A friendly, jocular expression of farewell to someone. The "funny pages" refers to the section of a newspaper in which comic strips are collected. I'd better be going now. I'll see you in the funny pages! My grandmother always used to say "see you in the funny pages" whenever we left her house.
See also: funny, page, see

be on the same page

To share the same general outlook or specific opinion as well as the same knowledge about something, especially an approach or strategy; to be in agreement or harmony about something. We all need to be on the same page before we try to present this complex idea to the boss.
See also: on, page, same

on the same page

Of two or more people, thinking in the same manner; having the same general outlook or position. We all need to be on the same page before we try to present this complex idea to the boss.
See also: on, page, same

page three girl

A woman who poses in little or no clothing for photographs featured in magazines or tabloid newspapers. Named for the particular page on which such a feature appeared in The Sun, a British tabloid. The former page three girl is now active in charities supporting girls and young women grappling with body image issues.
See also: girl, page, three

page through (something)

To casually flip through the pages of some written work. I paged through a few fashion magazines while waiting at the doctor's office. He just paged through my script before throwing it back on the desk and telling me he wasn't interested.
See also: page, through

read from the same page

To have the same understanding, thought process, or amount of knowledge (about something) as someone else. We all need to be reading from the same page before we try to present this idea to the boss. I think it would help if both parents attended the presentation. That way, you'll both be reading from the same page when it comes time to implement what we talk about.
See also: page, read, same

take a page from (someone's) book

To do something in the way someone else would do it; to behave or act like someone else. I think I'm going to take a page from your book and start going for a run first thing in the morning. Our youngest son was always very placid as a baby, but now that he's getting older, he's begun taking a page from our older boy's book.
See also: book, page, take

take a page out of (one's) book

To do something in the way one else would do it; to behave or act like one. I think I'm going to take a page out of your book and start going for a run first thing in the morning. I'm glad to see you're taking a page out of my book when it comes to preparing your tax returns early.
See also: book, of, out, page, take

take a page out of (someone's) book

To do something in the way someone else would do it; to behave or act like someone else. I think I'm going to take a page out of your book and start going for a run first thing in the morning. Our youngest son was always very placid as a baby, but now that he's getting older, he's begun taking a page out of our older boy's book.
See also: book, of, out, page, take

the printed page

A physical piece of paper on which something is written or printed. With the rise of smartphones, which require malleable, homogenous formats, crafting a piece of writing to be visually striking or appealing on the printed page has become something of a lost art.
See also: page, print

the printed word

Anything that is written on a physical piece of paper; printed media in general, especially books. It's important to foster a love of the printed word in children at an early age. The sudden and ubiquitous rise of e-books and smart devices led many to worry that the printed word may vanish altogether.
See also: print, word

turn the page

To make a transition to something else, especially a more positive period after a negative one; to move on. After a stressful and chaotic tenure at that firm, I'm excited to turn the page and start in this new position. I think we can turn the page on this discussion, Joe. There's nothing left we need to linger over.
See also: page, turn

read from the same page

 and sing from the same hymnbook
Cliché share the same understanding of something. Okay, I think we are reading from the same page now. We can discuss the future of this project more productively.
See also: page, read, same

take a leaf out of someone's book

 and take a page from someone's book
Fig. to behave or to do something in a way that someone else would. When you act like that, you're taking a leaf out of your sister's book, and I don't like it! You had better do it your way. Don't take a leaf out of my book. I don't do it well.
See also: book, leaf, of, out, take

on the same page

If two or more people are on the same page, they are in agreement about what they are trying to achieve. It makes life easier in our department when we know we're all on the same page. The party has done so much to get members of its organisation on-message and on the same page.
See also: on, page, same

turn the page

If someone or something turns the page, they make a fresh start after a period of difficulties and troubles. Shareholders at the company's annual meeting will be looking for signs that the troubled company really does mean to turn the page. We can play much better, but today I believe we turned the page. Compare with turn over a new leaf.
See also: page, turn

on the same page

(of two or more people) in agreement. US
See also: on, page, same

page three girl

a model whose nude or semi-nude photograph appears as part of a regular series in a tabloid newspaper.
This sort of photograph is featured on page three of the British tabloid newspaper The Sun.
See also: girl, page, three

be on the same ˈpage

(especially American English) think the same way or have the same opinion about something: I just want to make sure we’re all on the same page about this.
See also: on, page, same

the printed ˈword/ˈpage

stories, articles, etc. printed in a book, magazine, newspaper, etc.
See also: page, print, word

page through

v.
To go through some reading material quickly or superficially, turning from page to page, as in searching or browsing: I paged through the magazine to see if there were any interesting articles in it. You'll find some interesting things on that website if you page through it for a while.
See also: page, through

on the same page

mod. have the same understanding or amount of knowledge. (As if people were reading from the same page.) We’re not on the same page. Listen carefully to what I am telling you.
See also: on, page, same

See you in the funny pages

and SYITFP
sent. & comp. abb. I will see you around. (see also See you in church.) Bye, Tom. SYITFP.
See also: funny, page, see

take a page from someone’s book

tv. to copy or emulate. I took a page from Edison’s book and began inventing useful little things.
See also: book, page, take

on the same page, to be

To be in complete agreement. This term, from the second half of the 1900s, alludes to reading from the same page of a book. It has largely replaced the earlier on the same wavelength, which alluded to the radio waves of a broadcast and dates from the first half of the 1900s. The newer version appears in David Baldacci’s Hour Game (2004), “We need to coordinate and keep each other informed. We all need to be on the same page.”
See also: on, same
References in periodicals archive ?
Page 27: Top: AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell Bottom: Getty/Ghaith Abdul-Ahad
* Major content pages are generally kept current, but many linked pages contain outdated information--such as announcements about programs that will "start" in 2004.
All links should bring up the correct pages, the search tool (if there is one) should generate results, and photographs and other graphics should appear properly.
* Redesign text-heavy pages. Many of the pages do not scream "read me" because they are long lists of information.
These studies of the language of users' searches gave direction for developing the vocabulary terms MedlinePlus uses to direct users to Health Topic pages.
When a search engine like Yahoo.com or Google.com comes to index your site, it uses a simple process that begins on your home page. The process goes like this: Read the page, index the content.
Type in Check Your Order on the orders.asp page. We'll use the Database wizard to modify the existing Food database connection to display the customer orders.
The Green Design page, also available through the Clean Computer Campaign page, defines the concept of eco-labeling, shows pictures of the various labels in use, and provides guides to and comparisons of the growing number of eco-labeling programs for computers in Europe.
But that's the envelope editorial pages should be pushing.
The solution was obvious: develop and implement an international training management web page hosted on the DISAM web server.
As more Web sites are created using dynamic Web pages to serve their content, the Internet's ability to deliver that content in real time is decreasing.
The Creative Destruction of Manhattan, 1900-1940, by Max Page, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 303 pages, $27.50
What the new applications do is shift the development, from flat and static web pages to dynamically composed pages.
To accomplish this, the site uses WikiWikiWeb technology (developed by Ward Cunningham), which allows for fully editable Web pages to be created and posted in real time on the Web.