packed


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pack heat

To have one or more firearms, especially handguns, currently on one's person. Everyone in that gang packs heat, so I'd steer clear of them if I were you! I make sure I'm always packing heat when I go through this part of town.
See also: heat, pack

pack on the pounds

To put on weight quickly, especially a large or excessive amount. Wow, Jim really packed on the pounds on while he was on his sabbatical. I'm trying to pack on the pounds so I can make it on the football team this fall!
See also: on, pack, pound

packed to the gills

Completely full; teeming; having no room to spare. I've got so many meetings and deadlines these days that my schedule is packed to the gills! Her mind was packed to the gills with ideas for her new book. I felt packed to the gills after my grandmother's Thanksgiving meal.
See also: gill, packed

packed to the rafters

Completely full; teeming; having no room to spare. I've got so many meetings and deadlines these days that my schedule is packed to the rafters! Her mind was packed to the rafters with ideas for her new book. I felt packed to the rafters after my grandmother's Thanksgiving meal.
See also: packed

be packed (in) like sardines

To be very tightly or snugly packed together, especially in a small space. We didn't want to take more than one car, so we had to be packed like sardines in Jeff's little sedan for the four-hour drive to Moab. Having a concert in our friends café was such a good idea! Sure, we were packed in like sardines, but everyone had a great time.
See also: like, packed, sardine

pack (someone or something) (in) like sardines

To fit many people or things very tightly or snugly into a small space. We didn't want to take more than one car, so Jeff packed us like sardines in his little sedan for the four-hour drive to Moab. Having a concert in our friends café was such a good idea! Sure, we had to pack people in like sardines, but everyone had a great time. I wish you would just let us buy you a bigger backpack! It makes my own back hurt watching you pack those books like sardines into your little shoulder bag.
See also: like, pack, sardine

packed (in) like sardines

Very tightly or snugly packed together, especially in a small space. We didn't want to take more than one car, so we had to drive for about four hours packed like sardines in Jeff's little sedan. Having a concert in our friends café was such a good idea! Sure, we were packed in like sardines, but everyone had a great time.
See also: like, packed, sardine

pack a punch

1. To be able to punch powerfully. For such a scrawny kid, George sure can pack a punch—even the older kids are afraid of him!
2. By extension, to have a powerful effect or impact. I don't like spicy food, so I hope this salsa doesn't pack a punch.
See also: pack, punch

pack (something) away

1. To pack something into a container or enclosed space of some kind so that it may be stored or carried for future use. After the dinner party was over, they packed the good dishes and silverware away. I'm packing away my maternity clothes in case we decide to have another baby sometime in the future. I'm sorry, I already packed the toothpaste away for the trip. Isn't there another tube somewhere?
2. To eat a lot of something. Wow, that kids can really pack away the cake! He was so hungry that he packed two sandwiches away in about ten minutes.
See also: away, pack

pack (something) in

1. To pack something into a container or enclosed space of some kind so that it may be stored or carried for future use. I packed an extra chocolate bar in your backpack today as a treat. I'm packing my maternity clothes in a box in the attic we decide to have another baby sometime in the future. I'm sorry, I already packed the toothpaste in the suitcase for our trip. Isn't there another tube somewhere?
2. To manage to fit a lot of people or things into some enclosed space. Wow, they really pack the garlic in this dish, huh? Managers of the club have been accused of packing people in the club beyond its safety limits.
3. To manage to schedule a lot of activities into a limited amount of time. You sure packed in a lot in just a week! I've stopped trying to pack so many things to do in every time I travel because I end up not enjoying the location itself.
4. To surround something snugly within some substance or material. We'll have to pack the finger in ice if we want to have any chance of reattaching it. They packed the stereo equipment in foam to ensure it wasn't damaged during delivery.
5. To quit or give up something. I'm so glad you packed in the smoking—I wouldn't have been able to bear it if you had fallen ill from it. Tom packed his job in and moved to the countryside to work on his father's farm.
See also: pack

pack (something) into

1. To pack something into a container or enclosed space of some kind so that it may be stored or carried for future use. I'm sorry, I already packed the toothpaste into the suitcase for our trip. Isn't there another tube somewhere? I'm packing my maternity clothes into a box so we can keep it up in the attic, just in case we decide to have another baby sometime in the future.
2. To manage to fit a lot of people or things into some enclosed space. Wow, they really pack the garlic into this dish, huh? Managers of the club have been accused of packing people into the club beyond its safety limits.
3. To manage to schedule a lot of activities into a limited amount of time. You sure packed a lot into just a week! I've stopped trying to pack so many things to do into every trip I take because I end up not enjoying the location itself.
See also: pack

pack a wallop

1. To be able to punch very powerfully. For such a scrawny kid, George sure can pack a wallop—even the older kids are afraid of him!
2. By extension, to have a powerful effect or impact. I don't like spicy food, so I hope this salsa doesn't pack a wallop.
See also: pack, wallop

pack down

To press, push, or tamp something downward to compress it. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pack" and "down." I packed down the clothes as far as I could, but I still couldn't get the suitcase shut. We'll need to pack the soil down to create a strong foundation for the concrete.
See also: down, pack

pack together

To fit multiple people or things into a confined space or container. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pack" and "together." They packed all 20 of us together into a hot, stuffy meeting room to listen to the boss's boring lecture about workplace safety. I don't know how they packed together so many things into one box.
See also: pack, together

pack a gun

To have a firearm, especially a handgun, currently on one's person. There just aren't guns anywhere in the country. Even most of the police don't pack guns! I make sure I'm always packing a gun when I go through this part of town.
See also: gun, pack

pack a wallop

 and pack a punch
Fig. to provide a burst of energy, power, or excitement. Wow, this spicy food really packs a wallop. I put a special kind of gasoline in my car because I thought it would pack a punch. It didn't.
See also: pack, wallop

pack down

[for something] to settle down in a container. The cereal has packed down in the box so that it seems that the box is only half full. Everything was packed down carefully inside.
See also: down, pack

pack someone or something together

to press or squeeze people or things together. The ushers packed the people together as much as they dared. They packed together all the people standing in the room. They packed the cups together too tightly and some broke.
See also: pack, together

pack something down

to make something more compact; to press something in a container down so it takes less space. The traffic packed down the snow. Pack the grass down in the basket so the basket will hold more.
See also: down, pack

packed (in) like sardines

Fig. packed very tightly. It was terribly crowded there. We were packed in like sardines. The bus was full. The passengers were packed like sardines.
See also: like, packed, sardine

pack a punch

Also, pack a wallop.
1. Be capable of a forceful blow; also, deliver a forceful blow. For example, Knowing Bob could pack a wicked punch, they were careful not to anger him, or She swung her handbag, really packing a wallop. [Colloquial; c. 1920]
2. Have a powerful effect, as in That vodka martini packed a wallop. Thomas Wolfe had this figurative usage in a letter (c. 1938): "I think my play, The House, will pack a punch."
See also: pack, punch

packed in like sardines

Extremely crowded, as in I could barely breathe-we were packed in like sardines. This term, alluding to how tightly sardines are packed in cans, has been applied to human crowding since the late 1800s.
See also: like, packed, sardine

pack a punch

INFORMAL
COMMON If something packs a punch, it has a very powerful effect. He is known for designing clothes that really pack a punch. The advert packs a punch with its straightforward, real, no-tricks approach. Note: People also sometimes say that something packs a wallop. Many years after it was made, this movie still packs a wallop.
See also: pack, punch

packed like sardines

If a group of people are packed like sardines, they are standing very close together because there is not enough room in an enclosed space. We were packed like sardines in the ship and could barely move. Note: Other words such as crammed, jammed or squashed are sometimes used instead of packed. The male sauna was really packed. There were about five people squashed in there like sardines. Note: The image here is of tinned sardines which have been tightly packed.
See also: like, packed, sardine

pack heat

carry a gun. North American informal
See also: heat, pack

pack a punch

1 be capable of hitting with skill or force. 2 have a powerful effect.
See also: pack, punch

packed like sardines

crowded very close together.
See also: like, packed, sardine

ˌpack a (hard, etc.) ˈpunch

(informal)
1 be able to hit very hard: He’s a boxer who packs a nasty punch!
2 have a powerful effect on somebody: Their latest advertising campaign packs a hard punch.Don’t drink too much of his home-made beer — it packs quite a punch!
See also: pack, punch

packed (together) like sarˈdines

(informal) (of people) pressed tightly together in a way that is uncomfortable or unpleasant: On the tube in the rush hour the passengers are packed like sardines.
Sardines are a type of fish that are usually sold packed tightly together in small tins.
See also: like, packed, sardine

jampacked

and jam-packed
mod. full. This day has been jampacked with surprises.

jam-packed

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
It's a good bet to carry no more than one-third of your weight (backpack and packed items included) and most of that weight should rest on the hips.
When you're finished packing, fold the pants or dress back over the other packed items, which will create a cushion and prevent a crease from forming.
Some lemons grown and packed by Teague-McKevett bear the Silver Cord brand name, written as a rope lasso, while Limoneira sold lemons and valencia oranges under the Bridal Veil name, with an illustration of the famous waterfall in Yosemite.